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Islam, Women and Feminism ( 28 Dec 2021, NewAgeIslam.Com)

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Under The Mullahs’ Regime In Iran, Women Sell Their Hair To Make Ends Meet

New Age Islam News Bureau

29 December 2021

• Roa'a Al-Sayyed, Visually-Impaired Egyptian Girl Memorizes Whole Of Holy Quran In 18 Months

• National campaign ‘Ulama – Ambassadors of Girls Education’ launched in  Pakistan

• Afghan Women Protest Against Taliban Killings Of Ex-Soldiers

• Women Marriage Bill: Telangana Waqf Board To Convene Meeting With State’s Qazis

• Pakistan Condemns Taliban's Ban On Road Trips For Women

Compiled by New Age Islam News Bureau

URL:   https://www.newageislam.com/islam-women-feminism/mullah-regime-iran-hair/d/126058

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 Under The Mullahs’ Regime In Iran, Women Sell Their Hair To Make Ends Meet

 

Representative Photo/ National Council of Resistance of Iran

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by Sedighe Shahrokhi

24th December 2021

In his famous short story, “the Gift of the Magi,” O. Henry tells the tale of a wife who sold her hair for $20 to purchase a Christmas gift for her husband. Under the mullahs’ regime, in Iran, women must sell their hair for nearly $30 to merely survive.

Iran’s state media have acknowledged that Iranian women and girls sell their hair to cover their expenses due to the country’s economic crunch.

“Most of my clients sell their hair due to their financial problems. They tell me, ‘Cut as short as you want. But give us more money,’” says an Iranian barber, shedding light on this tragedy, according to the state-run Khorasan daily on December 22, 2021. Women’s barbershops are filled with the advertisement “We buy your hair.” Sellers also leave their announcements on walls.

“I sold my hair to cover my living expenses. When I saw the advertisement, I decided to sell my hair. I loved my hair, but I had no other choice,” the state-run Tejarat-news quoted Zahra, who sold her 50cm hair for 10 million rials or $33 (at the free market dollar exchange rate.)

“To enrol at a class for my job, I had to sell my hair. My husband did not agree with me, but I needed money, and I had no other choice,” Tejarat-news quoted another woman.

In April 2021, a barber told the state-run Khabar-Online that the price of hair would not exceed 10 million rials. “Women love their hair; they sell it because they need money,” she said.

Selling hair is not limited to young or middle-aged women. Teenage girls and children as young as ten years old also sell their hair.

“A ten-year-old girl sold her hair to purchase a cellphone. A middle-aged woman sold her hair to pay for her husband’s medications, who is now invalid after falling from a building. Another 21-year-old customer sold her hair to pay the installments of her sisters’ dowry. And a teenage girl sold her hair to enrol at high school,” Khorasan daily wrote on December 22.

A woman who was selling her daughters’ hair told Tejarat-news: “We desperately need another cell phone [to attend online classes]. My three daughters must share one cell phone, and it’s not possible. I sell their hairs for 40 million rials [nearly $40].”

In other countries, selling hair is a luxurious business. In the United States, women sell their hair sometimes up to thousands of dollars. But in Iran, despite the country’s vast natural resources, women must sell their hair to win their bread.

In recent years, as Iran’s economy rapidly falls apart due to the mullahs’ corruption, ineptitude, and mismanagement, businesses such as selling organs or selling hair have been booming. In addition, other phenomena have emerged, such as grave dwellers, renting rooftops, and collecting trash.

In an exclusive report in 2018, the Iranian Resistance revealed some aspects of selling vital organs tragedy in Iran. According to this report, “Kidneys are most in-demand, but a business that started more than a decade ago is no longer limited to the kidney but includes liver, bone marrow, and cornea. The liver is the second most frequently traded organ, and blood plasma is the latest addition to the list.”

Unlike what Iran pundits had tried to imply, the current economic crisis in Iran is not entirely by any measure due to sanctions. The regime has been squandering billions of dollars on its malign ambitions, such as its clandestine nuclear and missile programs and supporting its terrorist proxy groups across the Middle East.

In 2020, a heart-wrenching interview of a 29-yearyoungfather who wanted to sellhis heartcirculated on social media. This father had put an advertisement to sell his heart to ensure his family’s future.

“Yes, I know what would happen…. I have tried many other ways and reached a deadlock. This is the only solution to ensure the future of my children,” the man tells the buyer.  As a price for his heart, he gives ten billion rials, or $367,000, with Iran’s free market’s current dollar exchange rate at that time.

“It is estimated that the cost of the nuclear program should be estimated at between 1.5 to 2 trillion dollars. It seems that the initial assessment by the Budget and Planning Organization’s expert was not far from reality,” Arman daily wrote on December 4.

Khorasan daily on December 22 referred to the booming business of selling hair in Khorasan province, while one of Iran’s largest financial institutions, Astan-e Quds Razavi, is in that province.

Behzad Nabavi, a government minister in several administrations, said in an interview with the state-run Alef news agency on September 21, 2019, “In our country, there are four institutions which control 60 percent of the national wealth. This includes Executive Headquarters of Imam’s Directive (Setad Ejraie Farman Imam), Khatam-ol-Anbiay Base, Astan-e Quds, and Foundation of the Oppressed and Disabled. None of these institutions are in connection with the government and parliament.”

The Iranian regime has the ability and necessary funds to help Iranians and prevent them from selling their body parts. Iranian girls could easily attend their school without selling their hair to purchase stationery if any government other than the mullahs’ regime was in power.

Source: NCR Iran

https://www.ncr-iran.org/en/news/iran-women-sell-their-hair-to-make-ends-meet/

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Roa'a Al-Sayyed, Visually-Impaired Egyptian Girl Memorizes Whole Of Holy Quran In 18 Months

 

Roa'a al-Sayyed

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December 28, 2021

Roa'a al-Sayyed is an 11-year-old visually-impaired girl who managed to commit the entire Quran to her memory in 18 months.

Roa’a is a sixth grader residing in one of the rural areas of Dakahlia Governorate. She attended a local Quran learning institute in her own village, according to Youm7.

Ehab Al-Sharif, director of the institute, says Roa’a had been diligent since entering the center. She has won several awards in local Quranic competitions

He predicts a bright future for Roa’a because of her strong character and charisma.

Salem Bakr, one of the teachers at the institute, says that they are very happy with Roa’a’s presence, describing her as a source of happiness and joy for the institute. She gives hope to other learners, stressed the teacher.

Roa’a says she mainly memorized the Quran by listening to the verses through an application that she has on her smartphone. The Quran memorization has not negatively affected her daily school studies, rather, she has had progress in school as well.

The institute’s and local officials held a ceremony and honored Roa’a by giving her awards.

Source: ABNA24

https://en.abna24.com/news//11-year-old-visually-impaired-egyptian-girl-memorizes-whole-of-holy-quran-in-18-months_1213129.html

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National campaign ‘Ulama – Ambassadors of Girls Education’ launched in  Pakistan

DECEMBER 29, 2021

Pakistan Alliance for Girls Education in collaboration with Council of Islamic Ideology initiated the “Ulama – Ambassadors of Girls Education” campaign which was launched by President Dr Arif Alvi. Ulama at the national level participated in the campaign launch for the promotion of girls’ education and to end the disparities that exist in the education sector.

They also committed to become Ambassadors of Girls Education and to support PAGE, CII and the Government of Pakistan to raise awareness of the importance of education equally for both genders in light of Islam. Key Ulama of all sects from across the country were present at the launch event with the aim of fostering girls’ education in their respective areas.

The launch event started off with the recitation of Holy Quran followed by the welcoming remarks from Chairman Council of Islamic Ideology, Dr Qibla Ayaz. Dr Qibla Ayaz, thanked his excellency, the President of Pakistan, Dr Arif Alvi for launching the campaign and for supporting and promoting girls’ education in Pakistan. Being voice of the Ulama, Dr Qibla Ayaz stated that the Ulama are very much in favour of girls’ education across Pakistan and they will continue to promote girls’ education in their respective areas and regions with the aim to empower girls of Pakistan. Honorable Chairman CII, also shed light on the fact that the excellence of knowledge has been highlighted both directly and indirectly in Islam and that Islam does not give the message of opposing acquisition of education for girls but it promotes education of men and women equally.

The launch event proceeded with Executive Director, Pakistan Alliance for Girls Education, Fajer Rabia Pasha’s speech. Ms Fajer Rabia Pasha opened the speech by expressing that today is a historical moment for Pakistan. The launch of this campaign by the Honorable President of Pakistan, is not only evidence of Pakistan’s commitment to address gender disparity in education but to also engage all sections of the society in this process. She added that role of Ulama to address the current situation can not be ignored. In fact, the engagement of Ulama sends a positive message to the world. She said the current challenges demands a special focus on girls’ education, particularly improving their access to quality education facilities through creating an affable conducive environment for girls that tackles the social religious and socio-economic barriers, typically faced by the Pakistani girls. This is where the collaboration with Council of Islamic Ideology can make visible impact. Ms Fajer thanked the Ulama for their invaluable contribution and commitment for the promotion of girls education in Pakistan.

The launch event concluded with the keynote address from His Excellency, the President of Pakistan Dr Arif Alvi. In his keynote address, the president acknowledged and commended the efforts of Pakistan Alliance for Girls Education and Council of Islamic Ideology for promoting Girls Education across Pakistan by involving Ulama from all sects for advocacy. He further added that Islam has been accused of gender inequality a number of times, and the disparity in educational opportunities between men and women in many Muslim countries is often cited as a primary example. Islam was built upon one of the most important pillars of knowledge, which is why this is a sad reflection on Muslims and societies. There is no disagreement found within Islam on the acquisition of knowledge being obligatory and binding. He recognized that the promotion and betterment of status of Girl’s Education cannot take place without the support of Ulama. His Excellency, also added that including the promotion of Girls Education in Friday Sermons and utilizing mosques to educate the out of school children can contribute to the betterment of the overall status of Girls Education in Pakistan.

The event concluded with the digital formal launch of the campaign, Ulama – Ambassadors of Girls Education. News Desk

Source: Daily Times Pakistan

https://dailytimes.com.pk/861269/national-campaign-ulama-ambassadors-of-girls-education-launched/

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Afghan women protest against Taliban killings of ex-soldiers

Dec 28, 2021

KABUL: A crowd of women marched through the Afghan capital on Tuesday, accusing Taliban authorities of covertly killing soldiers who served the former US-backed regime.

Around 30 women gathered near a mosque in the centre of Kabul and marched a few hundred metres chanting "justice, justice" before they were stopped by Taliban forces, an AFP correspondent saw.

The Taliban also tried to prevent journalists from covering the march, organised against the "mysterious murders of young people, particularly the country's former soldiers", according to social media invitations.

Taliban fighters briefly detained a group of reporters and confiscated equipment from some photographers, deleting images from their cameras before returning them.

Since the hardliners returned to power in August they have effectively banned unsanctioned protests and frequently intervene to block demonstrations against their austere brand of Islam.

The protest comes weeks after separate reports by the United Nations, Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch said there were credible allegations of more than 100 extrajudicial killings by the Taliban since their takeover.

"I want to tell the world, tell the Taliban to stop killing. We want freedom, we want justice, we want human rights," said protester Nayera Koahistani.

In a statement read aloud by protester Laila Basam, the demonstrators called on the Taliban "to stop its criminal machine".

The statement said former soldiers and government employees of the old regime are "under direct threat", violating a general amnesty announced by the Taliban in August.

The protesters also aired objections to the ratcheting restrictions women are facing under Taliban rule.

The government issued new guidelines at the weekend banning women from travelling long distances unless escorted by a close male relative.

"Women's rights are human rights. We must defend our rights," said Koahistani.

Video footage posted online on Tuesday showed another women's protest held elsewhere in the capital that also called for women to be allowed education and work opportunities.

Source: Times of India

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/south-asia/afghan-women-protest-against-taliban-killings-of-ex-soldiers/articleshow/88545119.cms

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Women Marriage Bill: Telangana Waqf Board To Convene Meeting With State’s Qazis

29th December 2021

Hyderabad: The Chairman of the Telangana Waqf Board Mohammed Saleem called a meeting of State’s Qaziz on January 4 to apprise them of the guidelines with regard to women’s marriages.

This meeting is being called in the wake of the Central government’s proposed draft bill to increase the marriage age of women from 18 to 21 years.

Speaking to the media persons, Mohammad Saleem said that the Parliament has not given assent to the bill for women’s marriage age but still there are apprehensions among the people.

To escape the proposed law, parents are performing the marriages of their daughters and postponing their departure date. He advised the Qaziz to assure the parents not to panic. They may continue to marry off their daughters under the current law of 18 years.

Mohammed Saleem advised Qazis to guide the people and told them not to panic.

Currently, there is a sharp spurt in marriages taking place due to the fear of the proposed draft bill. Mohammed Saleem told the Muslim community not to worry as the TRS will not support the bill in Parliament.

Saleem also appealed to the Prime Minister not to tinker with the marriage age for the women as the issue is related to all the communities. Every community prefers to marry off their daughters on time.

Mohammad Saleem said that in the meeting of the representative of Qazi organizations necessary guidelines regarding the girls’ marriages shall be issued. “There is no need to be apprehensive as the bill has not been approved in any house of the Parliament. The Chief Minister of Telangana K Chandrasekhar Rao will not support this bill,” Mohammed Saleem said.

Source: Siasat Daily

https://www.siasat.com/women-marriage-bill-waqf-board-to-convene-meeting-with-qazis-2249675/

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Pakistan condemns Taliban's ban on road trips for women

DEC 28, 2021

The Pakistani government has criticized the Taliban administration in Afghanistan by denouncing the ultra-conservative group's new travel restrictions on women.

"Women can’t travel alone or go to schools and colleges ... this kind of retrogressive thinking is dangerous," Pakistan's Information Minister Fawad Chaudhry said late Monday. "This extremism can spill over into Pakistan and beyond," the minister said in the capital Islamabad.

His comments come after Taliban authorities said Sunday that women seeking to travel long distances should not be offered transport unless they are accompanied by a close male relative. The Taliban have set up a ministry for the "propagation of virtue and the prevention of vice," which issued the guidelines and also called on all vehicle owners to offer rides only to those women who wear the hijab.

Chaudhry's remarks appear to be the first-ever direct and public criticism of the group by Pakistan. The Taliban have been seeking global legitimacy for their interim government since they swept to power in August.

Pakistani leaders, including Prime Minister Imran Khan, have since been praising the Taliban and staying silent on the harsh new reality for women in the country, including restrictions to access education and employment opportunities.

A Pakistani region bordering Afghanistan has seen a major increase in terrorist attacks this year, a trend officials and experts attribute to the fall of Kabul to the Taliban.

Terrorism incidents in Balochistan increased by more than 90% in 2021 as compared to the previous year, according to a home department official from the southwestern province.

According to the data, at least 137 terrorist incidents were reported in 2021, resulting in the deaths of more than 130 people, including security forces.

"The frequency of smaller attacks has increased manifold in recent months," security analyst Amir Rana told the Deutsche Presse-Agentur (dpa) on Tuesday.

Militants and Baloch separatist groups, who are allegedly operating from lawless hideouts in Afghanistan, were behind the attacks in the province, he said.

The Pakistani Taliban, or Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), has carried out hundreds of attacks after the Taliban took over in Afghanistan. The group has claimed responsibility for at least 16 attacks in the country since the end of a monthlong cease-fire on Dec. 10.

Balochistan is Pakistan's largest and most volatile province. It borders both Afghanistan and Iran, and is regularly targeted by extremists, sectarian groups and sub-nationalist rebels.

Much of the violence is seen as a reaction from rebels to Beijing's investment plans in the region, an attempt to link China's Xinjiang province with the Arabian Sea in Balochistan with a network of roads and rails.

Attacks targeting law enforcement agencies and workers from other provinces, especially those working on projects initiated by China under a $62 billion investment plan, are common in Balochistan.

Afghan women march against discrimination

A crowd of women marched through Kabul on Tuesday, accusing Taliban authorities of covertly killing soldiers who served the former U.S.-backed regime. Around 30 women gathered near a mosque in the center of Kabul and marched a few hundred meters chanting "justice, justice" before they were stopped by Taliban forces, Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported.

The Taliban also tried to prevent journalists from covering the march, organized against the "mysterious murders of young people, particularly the country's former soldiers," according to social media invitations.

Taliban fighters briefly detained a group of reporters and confiscated equipment from some photographers, deleting images from their cameras before returning them.

Since the group returned to power in August, they have effectively banned unsanctioned protests and frequently intervene to block demonstrations.

The protest comes weeks after separate reports by the United Nations, Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch (HRW) said there were credible allegations of more than 100 extrajudicial killings by the Taliban since their takeover.

"I want to tell the world, tell the Taliban to stop killing. We want freedom, we want justice, we want human rights," said protester Nayera Koahistani.

In a statement read aloud by protester Laila Basam, the demonstrators called on the Taliban "to stop its criminal machine."

The statement said former soldiers and government employees of the old regime are "under direct threat," violating a general amnesty announced by the Taliban in August.

The protesters also aired objections to the ratcheting restrictions women are facing under Taliban rule. "Women's rights are human rights. We must defend our rights," said Koahistani.

Video footage posted online Tuesday showed another women's protest held elsewhere in the capital that also called for women to be allowed education and work opportunities.

Source: Daily Sabah

https://www.dailysabah.com/world/asia-pacific/pakistan-condemns-talibans-ban-on-road-trips-for-women

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URL:   https://www.newageislam.com/islam-women-feminism/mullah-regime-iran-hair/d/126058

 

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