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Islam, Women and Feminism ( 18 Dec 2019, NewAgeIslam.Com)

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Swedish Town Bans Muslim Veils: 'Here, Equality Applies'













Swedish Town ban involves all sorts of garments intended to conceal the face and is seen as a strike for equality.

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• Swedish Town Bans Muslim Veils: 'Here, Equality Applies'

• Human Rights Probe Calls for Improved Rehabilitation for Women Prisoners Held In Saudi Shelters

• Panic on Board as Veiled Woman Waves Quran, Threatens to Blow Up Plane in Istanbul Airport - Reports

• Muslim Woman Forced to Strip, Remove Hijab in Jail Receives $120,000 Settlement

• Tajik Woman Says Police Detained, Threatened Her Over Islamic Head Scarf In Anti-Hijab Raid

• How Arab States Can Gain From Women’s Workforce Participation

• Expressions of Muslim Women Creates Scholarship for Muslim Women Artists at the University of Ottawa

• Hyderabad Muslim Women’s Forum Condemns Attack On Students

Compiled By New Age Islam News Bureau

URL: http://www.newageislam.com/islam,-women-and-feminism/new-age-islam-news-bureau/swedish-town-bans-muslim-veils---here,-equality-applies-/d/120571

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Swedish Town Bans Muslim Veils: 'Here, Equality Applies'

The Moderate Party, the Sweden Democrats and the local Skurup Party have teamed together to railroad a ban on Islamic headclothes in Skurup municipality's schools and preschools.

The ban involves headscarves, burqas, niqabs and other garments that have the purpose of concealing the face and is valid for both students and staff.

According to the Sweden Democrats, the coalition managed to pass the bill by 22 to 19 votes after a “tough” debate, effectively outnumbering the Liberals and the “red-green” coalition. Previously, municipal officials even issued a statement claiming that a ban was “not possible”. After the vote, the bill received a round of spontaneous applause.

Among other things, the bill says: “When an immigrant comes to Sweden, it must be Swedish values that apply and in Sweden it is equality that applies, regardless of what was the case in the immigrant's former homeland is.”

Lars Nyström of the Sweden Democrats party described the debate as “one of the toughest” he has had during his three terms in office, with “a lot of emotions”. During the debate, the EU Convention was referenced. However, to this a Moderate party member pointed out that there is a ban in French schools.

He promised more proposals to “stir the pot”. In January, a bill that requires everybody to speak Swedish in the municipality's schools will be introduced.

In the 2018 election, the Sweden Democrats made major gains in Skurup. The party went from 20.4 percent to 26.1 percent of the vote, edging out its competitors.

The Sweden Democrats have gone from being a fringe party in the 1990s to winning 17.6 percent of the national vote in 2018. Despite sweeping electoral gains, however, the party has yet to name a cabinet minister due to traditional bloc politics, where parties team up to form a protective fence or cordon sanitaire. So far, alliances featuring the Sweden Democrats have only been made at the municipal level.

Previously, Staffanstorp Municipality, ruled by the Moderates, banned Islamic headwear up to sixth grade, in a move that was described to counter “honour culture”.

The number of Muslims in Sweden has soared in recent decades. In 1950, there were merely 500 Muslims in the Scandinavian country. Today, their share is estimated to have exceeded 800,000, amounting to 8.1 percent of the population, according to the Pew Research Centre.

https://sputniknews.com/europe/201912191077624351-swedish-town-bans-muslim-veils-here-equality-applies/

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Human Rights Probe Calls For Improved Rehabilitation For Women Prisoners Held In Saudi Shelters

FATIMA MUHAMMAD

December 18, 2019

JEDDAH: An in-depth probe by Saudi human rights officials into the running of shelters for women prisoners has called for improved programs to rehabilitate them back into society.

Inspectors from the Human Rights Commission (HRC), who visited the state-run homes throughout the Kingdom, also recommended tougher regulations be put in place regarding protection issues and complaints procedures.

The move follows the recent launch of an online campaign in the Kingdom to raise awareness of health and social issues surrounding female detention.

The care and welfare centers for troubled girls and young women held under arrest or detention orders, are affiliated with the Girls’ Social Welfare Institution, established by the Ministry of Labor and Social Development. The ministry oversees the operation of the shelters which house women under the age of 30, and separately, girls under the age of 15.

In its findings, the HRC also urged that inmates should not be allowed to stay on in homes after detention periods had expired.

The commission suggested exploring ways to ensure that all facilities had rehabilitation programs in place to cover inmates’ time in the homes and when they left, in order to ensure a smooth integration for them back into society and family life.

It also said homes should be properly regulated in line with protection rules, and that girls and women should be given an opportunity to complete their education and practice their professions.

In addition, the labor ministry should revitalize the role of civil societies and encourage the establishment of specialized institutions that supported and protected inmates as well as providing them with training and rehabilitation programs.

It was important, the commission said, to have appropriate facilities that took into consideration inmates’ circumstances as well as their psychological and social state.

The HRC added that shelters must be well-equipped to provide specialized treatment and rehabilitation programs for addiction cases and that women with mental health issues should be treated in conjunction with the Ministry of Health. Severe and chronic cases should be transferred to mental health hospitals for treatment.

The commission pointed out that all staff and cadre working in such facilities should be well-qualified, well-trained and be able to carry out emergency first aid, and the number of specialized professionals should be increased.

During inspections, the HRC discovered that some female inmates had stayed on in facilities beyond the end of their terms, and it noted that center cleaning and hygiene services were unsatisfactory, and others were poorly equipped.

The commission inspectors reported that some cadre members were not qualified to handle certain cases and sometimes used ineffective methods. Also, facilities did not have guidelines on complaints procedures, and some were without operative medical clinics.

Dr. Samirah Al-Ghamdi, a member of the Himaya protection organization, said keeping female inmates in shelters without empowering them was futile and called for the procedures and mechanisms of accepting and taking in female inmates to be reconsidered.

“When the victims get admitted into the shelter facilities, they have no choice because this is the only shelter and place where they can stay. We need an empowerment program that can provide psychological and economic support for each and every female inmate and educate them about their rights.

“Inmates should be rehabilitated so that they can start a new life and depend on themselves after they leave the shelter. Any inmate, regardless of the seriousness or the gravity of her case, should have access to rehabilitation even if she is going to stay one day or a week in the shelter,” she added.

Al-Ghamdi pointed out that many families refused to take in their daughters after they had left shelters.

https://www.arabnews.com/node/1600986/saudi-arabia

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Panic On Board as Veiled Woman Waves Quran, Threatens to Blow Up Plane in Istanbul Airport - Reports

18.12.2019

A flight from Istanbul to Tymbou in northern Cyprus was reportedly cancelled over a terror scare prompted by one of the passengers. The woman, who wore sunglasses and covered her face with a veil, claimed to be a member of FETO – the Fethullah Terrorist Organisation, linked to US-based Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen by the Turkish government.

A woman claiming to be a terrorist and threatened to blow up an aircraft in Istanbul's Sabiha Gokcen airport was surrounded and restrained by fellow passengers.

The Turkish newspaper Hurriyet reports that the woman, wearing a face veil and dark glasses, started shouting and waving a Quran before take-off, right when the plane, destined for Tymbou in northern Cyprus from Istanbul, was on the runway.

Before security arrived and escorted her off the plane, she is said to have had a row with other travellers and lit cigarettes. Although she allegedly claimed that she had five bombs, nothing was found on board.

While the Cyprus Mail reports that the flight was cancelled, some reports suggested that it took off late. Following the unrest, some passengers are said to have returned to the tarmac.

According to the Turkish government, FETO is comprised of followers of Fethullah Gulen, a former political ally of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who currently resides in the United States. However, he denies these claims, insisting that his movement is peaceful. Turkey has demanded Gulen’s extradition for a number of years.

Ankara accuses the organisation of orchestrating the 2016 coup attempt that left 251 people killed and nearly 2,200 injured. Since then, over 50,000 citizens have been arrested, including state and military personnel, civil activists, journalists, and teachers. Tens of thousands more citizens accused of having ties with FETO have been dismissed or suspended.

https://sputniknews.com/middleeast/201912181077616281-panic-veiled-woman-Quran-threat-istanbul-airport/

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Muslim Woman Forced to Strip, Remove Hijab in Jail Receives $120,000 Settlement

KATHERINE RODRIGUEZ

18 Dec 2019

A Minnesota Muslim woman who was forced to strip and remove her hijab while being arrested for a traffic violation in 2013 received a $120,000 settlement.

Aida Shyef Al-Kadi, of St. Louis Park, Minnesota, appeared at a press conference Tuesday with attorneys from the Minneapolis chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) to announce the settlement that U.S. District Court Judge John Tunheim approved last month.

“It was one of the most humiliating and harmful experiences of my life,” Al-Kadi, 57, told reporters about her treatment in the jail in August 2013 that she alleged violated her religious and constitutional rights. “I knew that I did not want any other Muslim woman to experience what I did.”

A judge issued an arrest warrant for Al-Kadi after she failed to show up in court over a traffic offense while taking her daughter to the hospital.

When Al-Kadi turned herself in, officers told her to remove her clothing and her hijab in front of male corrections officers. After she objected, she said she was taken to a holding cell where she removed her hijab in front of a male corrections officer.

Al-Kadi said she agreed to remove her hijab for her booking photo after being told it would not be released publicly. She found the photo months later on a third-party website that charges users to take the photos down.

After she took the photo, corrections officers gave her a bedsheet to use as a headscarf and was told to change out of her clothes and into a jail uniform. Two female corrections officers were watching her at the time.

Under the settlement, the jail instated specific rules about how to treat inmates who wear religious head garments while they are being booked and the county agreed to delete all electronic copies and demolish hard copies of Al-Kadi’s booking photo.

The county revised its jail policies in 2014 to state that bedsheets would not longer be used and that inmates who wear hijabs would not be forced to take them off in front of men.

However, the settlement does not require the county to admit it did anything wrong in Al-Kadi’s case.

“We believe that this settlement agreement is fair and in the best interests of all of our residents. Ramsey County’s values hold that the rights, beliefs, well-being and dignity of all our residents are protected and honored in all aspects of what we do,” Ramsey County Board Chair Jim McDonough said in a statement Tuesday.

“The practices outlined in the agreement to improve the booking process for those with religious head coverings better reflect these values,” his statement continued.

https://www.breitbart.com/crime/2019/12/18/muslim-woman-forced-strip-remove-hijab-jail-receives-120000-settlement/

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Tajik Woman Says Police Detained, Threatened Her Over Islamic Head Scarf In Anti-Hijab Raid

December 18, 2019

A Tajik woman has accused Dushanbe police of insulting and threatening her after she was detained along with some two dozen others at a raid targeting women wearing Islamic headwear.

Nilufar Rajabova says she was taken from a minibus by police and officials from the state Committee for Women’s Affairs on December 14.

The officials told her the reason for her detention was her Islamic hijab and took her to the Sino district police station along with four other women passengers also wearing head scarves.

Tajikistan, a Muslim-majority country of some 9 million people in Central Asia, has banned the wearing of the hijab in schools, offices, and public places as part of a broader campaign against what authorities describe as religious extremism.

Rajabova said there were some 20 other women at the police station, rounded up from streets, bazaars, and other places for breaching the ban.

“Officials told us we should move to Afghanistan or Iran if we want to wear the hijab. They said we’re ruining the city’s look with our clothing,” Rajabova told RFE/RL on December 16.

Hijab 'Hooliganism'

The women were initially given a lecture about the ban, forced to remove their Islamic headgear, and were offered a smaller kerchief to wear instead of the hijab.

But on December 18, the Dushanbe city court ordered Rajabova to pay a fine of about $56 after accusing her of "hooliganism."

The charge against Rajabova stems from an official complaint filed by Raano Abdulloeva, an official in the Sino district’s Women’s Affairs Department.

Rajabova rejects the charge.

The court and the Women's Affairs Department refused to comment.

A Tajik woman has accused Dushanbe police of insulting and threatening her after she was detained along with some two dozen others at a raid targeting women wearing Islamic headwear.

Nilufar Rajabova says she was taken from a minibus by police and officials from the state Committee for Women’s Affairs on December 14.

The officials told her the reason for her detention was her Islamic hijab and took her to the Sino district police station along with four other women passengers also wearing head scarves.

Tajikistan, a Muslim-majority country of some 9 million people in Central Asia, has banned the wearing of the hijab in schools, offices, and public places as part of a broader campaign against what authorities describe as religious extremism.

Rajabova said there were some 20 other women at the police station, rounded up from streets, bazaars, and other places for breaching the ban.

“Officials told us we should move to Afghanistan or Iran if we want to wear the hijab. They said we’re ruining the city’s look with our clothing,” Rajabova told RFE/RL on December 16.

Hijab 'Hooliganism'

The women were initially given a lecture about the ban, forced to remove their Islamic headgear, and were offered a smaller kerchief to wear instead of the hijab.

But on December 18, the Dushanbe city court ordered Rajabova to pay a fine of about $56 after accusing her of "hooliganism."

The charge against Rajabova stems from an official complaint filed by Raano Abdulloeva, an official in the Sino district’s Women’s Affairs Department.

Rajabova rejects the charge.

The court and the Women's Affairs Department refused to comment.

In 2018, authorities introduced a 376-page guideline -- The Guidebook To Recommended Outfits In Tajikistan -- that outlines what Tajik women should wear for different occasions.

Tajikistan has also closed down all but one Islamic madrasah, prohibited minors from attending mosqus, and outlawed the IRPT -- which used to be an influential opposition party and also member of the governing coalition -- after declaring it a "terrorist" organization.

The government justifies the moves as necessary to curtail the threats of extremism. Critics, however, accuse the government of restricting citizens' freedom and rights.

https://www.rferl.org/a/tajik-woman-police-detained-threatened-islamic-head-scarf-in-anti-hijab-raid/30332633.html

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How Arab states can gain from women’s workforce participation

December 18, 2019

CALINE MALEK

ABU DHABI: The importance of gender equality — equitable or fair representation of men and women — is gaining ground in Arab countries whose leaders and governments have come to regard it as an economic and strategic imperative.

The consensus view of a group of experts who took part in a panel discussion at the recent SALT Conference in Abu Dhabi is that countries that boost women’s employment are, sooner or later, likely to reap economic rewards.

Estimates show that bringing each GCC member up to the best regional standard for women’s workforce participation would roughly add $180 billion — or 7 percent — to the size of the bloc’s combined economy by 2025, while full gender parity would add 32 percent, or $830 billion.

“The Middle East has traditionally been behind other regions of the world in terms of the gender gap,” said Masuda Sultan, chief executive officer of Symbio Services and a women’s rights advocate. “But that’s changing, with countries like the UAE leading the way amid a revolutionary time for the region.”

From establishing a Gender Balance Council to guaranteeing that women will comprise almost half the seats in the Federal National Council (FNC), the UAE is seen as having made great strides in the field.

“Since its inception, the UAE has been a champion of female empowerment and equality,” said Dr. Shayma Fawwaz, owner and founder of Gossip The Brand and an Emirati entrepreneur.

“The country’s founding father, the late Sheikh Zayed, started this mission and always saw that women were half of society and should be empowered through education and the workforce.

“My mother was one of the founding members of the UAE, convincing parents to let their children go to school and universities, but the leaders had a clear vision: Women have to be a part of society, educated and allowed to do work that they can be proud of.”

In 2012, the UAE Cabinet made it compulsory for corporations and government agencies to include women on their boards of directors.

“Women proved themselves in many workplaces and today we want them to have a strong presence in decision-making positions in our institutions,” Dubai’s Ruler and UAE Vice President Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid said on Twitter when he announced the decision.

Speaking as an Emirati woman, Fawwaz said: “Currently, we have equal pay between men and women and we have a new maternity leave extended from one to three months. I have always found Emirati men to be very supportive and I am very proud because it is part of our culture.”

As for Saudi Arabia, many gradual reforms had been introduced since its accession to the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women in 2000.

The announcement of the Vision 2030 reform plan in 2016 gave a massive fillip to women’s empowerment. Besides changes to laws and regulations governing their lives, Saudi women have been allowed to enter new fields such as aviation, state security, economy, entrepreneurship, tourism and entertainment.

According to studies reported by Scientific American, organizations with inclusive cultures have greater innovation, creativity and bottom-line results.

“When a company’s culture feels fair and inclusive, women and underrepresented groups are happier and more likely to thrive,” said McKinsey & Company in its “Women in the Workplace 2019” report.

Many say that the business case for equality and inclusion is no less compelling in the Arab world than it is in the West. Several studies have reported a correlation between an inclusive workplace and a diverse workforce with such positive business metrics as productivity, profitability, quality, employee commitment and retention.

That being said, in the Middle East and North Africa region there are legal impediments to progress on the issue of gender equality, according to Raya Abu Gulal, founder of the Women Lawyers Group ME.

“If we look at the constitutions of most Arab countries, they support gender equality, and one of the first provisions referred to is that men and women are equal,” she said.

“But the reality of regulations concerning women, such as domestic violence, sexual harassment and inheritance, is different. They are not in line with the provisions in the constitutions.”

Implementation is another story as many women and men are not adequately educated when it comes to their rights or women’s management of their money under Sharia law.

“We also have to look at the culture, traditional barriers and ongoing conflicts in the Arab world that are holding women back from fully exercising their legal rights,” Gulal said.

“We have great initiatives and support but there are a lot of cultural as well as security issues, which are a major disadvantage for women because they are more vulnerable.”

Then are other drawbacks, such as bankruptcy laws that are not conducive to gender diversity, especially when one considers the risks aspiring female entrepreneurs face in the form of harsh penalties if they fail to clear their debts.

“There’s a myth about women with a family and children being less willing than men to take the risk of borrowing money to set up their own business when it could end in imprisonment,” Gulal said.

“We have to improve the relevant laws to make it easier for women to have access to finance and better terms if they can’t clear their debts.”

In the context of the UAE, Nabyl Al-Maskari, chief executive officer of Al Maskari Holding, said that gender inclusion, especially empowerment of women, was among the country’s foundational principles while education has been one of the main drivers of the achievements of Emirati women.

Currently, more than 70 percent of university graduates in the UAE are women, which perhaps explains why about 10 percent of the country’s total national income is driven by women, compared with the global figure of 1 percent.

“This has a lot to do with women receiving an education and pursuing a career,” he said. “It’s really about encouraging women to get an education.”

Al-Maskari recounted that his Emirati mother was one of the first entrepreneurs in the UAE and the first woman to receive a construction license in the country.

“My mother is well known among the community as a pioneering woman engineer, a Ph.D holder and geophysicist,” he said.

“She did that because, for her, it was the way in which she could contribute most back to her country and to her society.”

https://www.arabnews.com/node/1600556/middle-east

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Expressions of Muslim Women Creates Scholarship for Muslim Women Artists at the University of Ottawa

Written by  Chelby Daigle

Expression of Muslim Women (EMW), a group that organizes an annual creative arts festival showcasing the artistic and musical talents of Ottawa's Muslim women, has established a scholarship for women who are registered in an undergraduate fine arts (music, theatre or visual arts) program at the University of Ottawa and who are actively involved within the Muslim community.

Muslim Link interviewed members of the EMW team about the scholarship.

How did the idea to create a scholarship for Muslim women studying Fine Arts come about?

Expressions of Muslim Women is dedicated to promoting the artistry of Muslim women in the National Capital Region. With the guidance of our mentor, Khadija Haffajjee, we aimed to put aside a portion of the proceeds from our annual shows towards a scholarship fund. We wanted to start a legacy to support Muslim women artists who wish to pursue higher studies in their field of art. We wanted Muslim woman artists to know they had the support of other Muslim women and in particular of a Muslim organization called Expressions of Muslim Women.

How did EMW go about proposing the scholarship to the University of Ottawa?

We looked at the different academic institutions in Ottawa, and concluded we could start supporting students at the University of Ottawa. We had a contact at the University of Ottawa, who also had regularly attended and supported our EMW events over the years. She answered our questions regarding our options and facilitated the process of setting up the scholarship with the University of Ottawa.

Will fundraising for the scholarship become a regular part of EMW's annual events?

For now, there are enough funds for the next three years. We can revisit our options when the funds need replenishing.

Is there anything else you would like to add?

EMW has endeavoured to encourage and support the work of Muslim women artists in our Muslim and greater communities. Muslim women artists have an important and needed role in the greater Canadian arts communities. The members of Expressions Muslim Women are grateful to be able to support through this scholarship fund, Muslim women artists to pursue and develop their skills, abilities and talent.

To learn more about the EMW Scholarship for Women Active in the Muslim Community, click here

Watch a 2017 interview with EMV by studies from the Carleton University School of Journalism below (It may take a few moments for the video to load from YouTube).

https://muslimlink.ca/news/expressions-of-muslim-women-creates-scholarship-for-muslim-women-artists-at-the-university-of-ottawa

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Hyderabad Muslim Women’s Forum Codemns Attack On Students

December 18, 2019

Jamia Milia Islamia University, New Delhi became the centre of students protest against the Citizenship Amendment Act which was passed in the parliament last week. Even Aligarh Muslim University students were protesting against this Act. On 15th December 2019, the JMIU students were protesting peacefully within the campus. They did not even go near the barricades put by the police personnel. The police entered in the campus without permission and started assaulting students who were protesting peacefully against the Citizenship Amendment Act. First they closed the roads from Kalindi Kunj to Ashram so that the students cannot escape. They entered the hostels and attacked students, shelled tear gas in the library and attacked students praying in the Masjid, thereby terrorizing them. Girl students had to hide themselves in the toilets due to fear of molestation as the lights were put off!

Hyderabad Muslim Women’s Forum strongly condemns the brutal attacks on the students of Jamia Milia Islamia on 15th December 2019, marching in a peaceful protest against the Citizenship Amendment Act (2019) inside their University’s Campus. The police and CRPF personnel entered the Campus without permission from the University authorities. They started attacking the students with lathis, threw tear gas inside the library and entered hostels to beat up students and vandalize student property. Those praying inside a Masjid were also not spared. Most shamefully, women students hiding in fear inside washrooms were molested after switching off the electricity.

According to the students, these actions were all pre-planned since the police first closed the roads from Kalindi Kunj to Ashram leading to the University, so that they would be helplessly trapped. Images and videos used by news agencies and circulating widely on the internet and social media show policemen involved in burning buses and other senseless, unwarranted acts of violence. In fact, these videos also appear to have men who were not wearing proper police uniforms and mercilessly thrashing the students. It is being reported that these men may belong to fascist forces who opportunistically joined the police in attacking these young students.

Following this barbaric attack, a large number of students were illegally detained in police stations. Their mobile phones were snatched away and lawyer-friends were not allowed to visit them. According to news reports, over 200 students are severely injured and several are in critical condition. This was followed by similar brutal attacks on students at Aligarh Muslim University. Flash bombs, tear gas shelling and firing was carried out against students inside the AMU campus. They are being intimidated and threatened, curfew has been imposed and internet services are being blocked.

The Citizenship Amendment Act goes against the letter and spirit of the Indian Constitution, which enshrines the right to equality and protects all its citizens against discrimination. The Citizenship Amendment Act now gives illegal immigrants from six religious communities from Bangladesh, Pakistan and Afghanistan the right to acquire Indian citizenship. However, it excludes minorities who claim to be Muslims (such as Hazara, Ahmediya etc.). Vast numbers of citizens across the country have protested and continue to speak out against this discriminatory and divisive aspect as well.

It should be clear to all civic-minded people that peaceful demonstrations and protests constitute the very fabric of a democratic country. Such public protests by our students or any other individual does not constitute criminal conduct. This, the inhuman, senseless and cowardly acts by the police and the CRPF are highly condemnable. As citizens none of us can and should tolerate this high handedness of the state and the police whose duty in fact is to protect the people they serve and uphold the laws of our country. We extend our whole hearted support to all the courageous and brave students who stood up on behalf of all the citizens of our country. It is young women and men like them who continue to inspire the rest of us and hold out hope for the future of our country.

Hyderabad Muslim Women’s Forum

Khalida Parveen, Activist

Sherin B.S., EFL University

Marjan, Research Scholar

Farzana Khan, Activist

Asiya Khan, Activist

Nazia Akhtar, Research Scholar

Moqheeta, Social Worker

Rubina Nafees, Safa NGO

Nikhat Fatima, Activist

Mandakini, Advocate

Sharifa Siddiqui, Counsellor

Asiya Shervani

Kaneez Fathima, Civil Rights Activist

Sajida Sultana, Academic

Suneetha A., Research Scholar

Asma Rasheed, EFL University

Ayesha Ameer

Raheela Farooq Khan

Ayesha Farooqui, Retd. Professor

Noorjahan Siddiqui, My Choices

Salma Begum, Advocate

Shahnaz Ilyas, Activist

Sana Abdul Wahhab, Advocate

https://countercurrents.org/2019/12/hyderabad-muslim-womens-forum-codemns-attack-on-students

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URL: http://www.newageislam.com/islam,-women-and-feminism/new-age-islam-news-bureau/swedish-town-bans-muslim-veils---here,-equality-applies-/d/120571

 

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