New Age Islam
Mon Nov 23 2020, 04:30 PM

Islam, Women and Feminism ( 3 Jun 2013, NewAgeIslam.Com)

Girls a Burden on Guardians for Failing to Manage the Quazis in Bangladesh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zeynep Fadillioglu: the first woman to design a mosque in modern Turkey

 

Little Sympathy as Topless Protesters Face Tunis Trial

Indonesia Promotes Muslim Fashion

Fehmida Mirza Calls Pakistan’s New Speaker’s Election ‘Historic’

Saudi Society Is Game for Women Sports

Woman in Red Becomes a Symbol for Istanbul's Female Protesters

Should Women Go Out or Work At Home, Shoura Council Split over Recommendation

Indonesia’s Bandung Students Claim Sex Harassment by Principal

Woman Detained For Insulting Malaysian King on Facebook

Women from Poorer Backgrounds Are Less Subject To Violence

In Afghanistan, grief for a husband who shouldn’t have died

Meet Zeynep Fadillioglu: the first woman to design a mosque in modern Turkey

Volunteers to Help Women in Saudi Grand Mosque

First Saudi Sports Complex for Women Opens In Al-Khobar Province

Compiled by New Age Islam News Bureau

URL: http://newageislam.com/islam,-women-and-feminism/new-age-islam-news-bureau/girls-a-burden-on-guardians-for-failing-to-manage-the-quazis-in-bangladesh/d/11890

 

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Girls a Burden on Guardians for Failing to Manage the Quazis in Bangladesh

 June 04, 2013

The parents cannot go for any legal actions for failing to manage the marriage registration papers

Poor guardians of hundreds of eligible girls in Tahirpur Upazila of Sunamganj cannot arrange marriage of their daughters for inability to manage dowry money.

These girls are often treated as burden on their parents as well as society.

Sometimes, rich and influential people marry beautiful girls of poor parents in exchange of money.

They in collusion with unscrupulous Quazis (marriage registrars) marry the girls by filling up marriage registration forms showing ‘cabin’ of only Tk20, 000 to Tk30, 000, according to a UNB report.

After a few days, these influential people withdraw the forms from Quazis (marriage register) by giving them some money and divorce the girls.

After divorce, these girls have no other option than returning to their parents.

The parents cannot go for any legal actions for failing to manage the marriage registration papers.

A woman complained to this correspondent that she got married when she was student of a primary school.

Her husband took some money from her illiterate father as dowry.

After the marriage, her guardian came to know that her husband had married another woman earlier and kept it secret.

After she had a baby, the husband deserted her and the child and married for the third time elsewhere.

The young lady with her baby returned to her father’s house and became burden on the father.

Now the day labourer father cannot further arrange marriage of the young lady for lack of money.

It is learnt, in the rural areas, for hundreds of eligible girls it is difficult to get married due to lack of dowry money.

Many girls become subjected to torture for dowry as well. As their guardians are not educated enough, they cannot take legal actions.

http://dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2013/jun/03/girls-tahirpur-burden-guardians

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Little sympathy as topless protesters face Tunis trial

 June 04, 2013

While some Tunisians believe Femen activist Amina Sboui is being harshly treated for her anti-Islamist protest, there is little public sympathy for three European women who bared their breasts in support of her.

The three women, two French and one German, face jail terms of up to a year when they go on trial in Tunis on Wednesday, although their lawyer is confident of a lighter sentence.

They are charged with public indecency after staging a topless protest last week outside the main courthouse in Tunis in support of Sboui, who was arrested after painting the word “Femen” on a wall near a cemetery in an act of protest against hardline Islamists.

Also Wednesday, Sboui, a young Tunisian with the same “sextremist” Femen movement as the Europeans, is to appear before an investigating judge and faces possible charges of indecency and desecrating a cemetery.

Sboui, who has been held in detention since May 19, faces between six months and two years in jail, although the judge has indicated that she could be accused of acting as part of an organised gang and therefore attract a heavier sentence.

But while the ruling Islamist party Ennahda is often accused by its secular opponents of seeking to Islamise society, the May 29 topless protest -- the first in the Arab world -- did nothing to win the opposition’s support in socially conservative Tunisia, or renew the debate about women’s rights.

Even if Tunisia’s secular and feminist groups sympathise with the young Tunisian’s plight, few of them are rushing to support her European comrades.

“What has happened to Amina, this ruthlessness, is not justified. She does not in any way represent a threat to national security,” said Nadia Chaabane, MP for the secular centre-left party Al-Massar.

“But I don’t understand the Femen reaction, which has aggravated her situation,” she added.

“It is a sterile and pointless provocation. This incident distracts us from the most serious problems we face today, the socio-economic problems, the drafting of the constitution, the violence, etc. Frankly, the Femen (demands) are the last thing I’m worried about.”

The press has also chafed at their protest.

“Crudely provoking... is not an ideal way to challenge,” Tunisian daily Le Temps said on Sunday.

The three young women were identified by the Femen movement in Paris as Pauline Hillier and Marguerite Stern, both French, and Josephine Markmann from Germany.

France said it hopes the Tunis court will not be too harsh.

“The Tunisian judiciary is independent, but in the end I still hope it will be lenient,” said Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius.

Souheib Bahri, one of the lawyers of the three women, who are being held in the Manouba prison in a suburb of the capital, is confident about the outcome of the trial.

“I expect a light sentence,” he told AFP.

He said his clients had staged their controversial protest to draw attention to the plight of Sboui, who before her arrest had received threats from Islamists for having published topless pictures of herself on the Internet in March.

“They say: ‘We have done this to attract international attention, because Amina had no support in Tunisia’,” he said.

Ennahda has yet to comment on the Femen campaign even though it was the group’s first target.

Last weekend in Canada, a topless activist interrupted a speech by Hamadi Jebali, former prime minister and secretary general of the party, shouting “Free Amina!”

Since the 1950s, Tunisia has had the most liberal laws in the Arab world on women’s rights, and the Islamists are often forced to defend themselves against the charge of wanting to roll back those rights.

The latest edition of the proposed new constitution, drafted in April, states that “all male and female citizens have the same rights and duties,” and “guarantees equal opportunity to men and women.”

http://english.alarabiya.net/en/perspective/features/2013/06/04/Little-sympathy-as-topless-protesters-face-Tunis-trial-.html

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Indonesia promotes Muslim fashion

 4 June 2013

Lanky models in high heels saunter down the catwalk, one wearing a huge pink rose headpiece while another’s face is draped in a taupe silk headscarf adorned with dangling gold accessories.

But this is not a typical fashion show. There’s no-see-through sheaths, naked midriffs or long exposed legs that scream sexy. Instead, everyone on the runway at the Islamic Fashion Fair show is covered from head to foot in loose-flowing fabrics with a variety of textures and colors.

Indonesia hopes to become the Paris of Muslim fashion by 2020 with its bold designs and creative modern head wraps. The style is a far cry from the conservative black abayas worn in the Middle East. The colors range from fresh and light pastels to demure earth tones and lime green turbans along with wild print jackets. There’s also a bit of shape revealed while keeping everything covered.

“Muslim fashion is always considered to be conservative,” said Abel Haraba, a designer who showcased his clothes at the fashion fair that ended this week.

“I’m trying to change that image by creating attractive designs and also to make those who wear my creations look more beautiful.”

Indonesia is the world’s most populous Muslim country.

http://english.alarabiya.net/en/life-style/fashion-and-beauty/2013/06/04/Indonesia-promotes-Muslim-fashion.html

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Fehmida Mirza Calls Pakistan’s New Speaker’s Election ‘Historic’

 June 4, 2013

ISLAMABAD: As the country’s first female speaker of the National Assembly, Dr Fehmida Mirza passed on the proverbial torch to her successor Sardar Ayaz Sadiq after deeming the day to be “historic” for her.

“After completing my five-year term as an elected speaker of the National Assembly, I am transferring this responsibility to another elected speaker.”

“The election of a new speaker is a good omen for a democratic setup…he will enjoy unwavering support for his endeavours from me.”

After vacating the speaker’s office, Mirza will sit in the lower house during this tenure for the third time after winning a seat from Badin, Sindh. The outgoing speaker took the opportunity to laud parliamentary performance during the last tenure.

“The 13th National Assembly has confronted many challenges and deserves due credit for passing the 18th, 19th and 20th constitutional amendments and restoring the 1973 Constitution in its essence,” she said.

http://tribune.com.pk/story/558601/transition-fehmida-mirza-calls-new-speakers-election-historic/

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Saudi Society Is Game for Women Sports

 4 June 2013

Saudi Arabia’s first women’s sports centre has been opened in the eastern city of Alkhobar under a license issued by the Youth Welfare Presidency.

Hanaa Al-Zuhair, owner of the centre, said the license allows women to take part in sports including karate. The centre also runs weight loss programs and special activities for children. The centre’s opening was attended by a number of businesswomen and prominent female figures.

“We have already appointed Saudi trainers who have been trained abroad,” the owner told Al-Watan daily. Its karate trainer is a black-belt winner. “We have a trainer for yoga and other sports,” Al-Zuhair said and disclosed plans to launch a campaign to reduce obesity among kids.

Women welcomed the centre as they were looking for such a facility for many years. Health experts believe such centres would help females win the battle of the bulge and keep diabetes away.

The Kingdom last month allowed girls in private schools to play sports, the latest in a series of steps aimed at safeguarding women’s rights.

http://www.arabnews.com/news/453940

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Woman in red becomes a symbol for Istanbul's female protesters

Reuters

 June 04, 2013

In her red cotton summer dress, necklace and white bag slung over her shoulder she might have been floating across the lawn at a garden party; but before her crouches a masked policeman firing teargas spray that sends her long hair billowing upwards. Endlessly shared on social media and

replicated as a cartoon on posters and stickers, the image of the woman in red has become the symbol for female protesters during days of violent anti-government demonstrations in Istanbul.

Full report at:

http://www.hindustantimes.com/world-news/restofasia/Woman-in-red-becomes-a-symbol-for-Istanbul-s-female-protesters/Article1-1070590.aspx

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Should Women Go Out or Work At Home Shoura Council Split over Recommendation

June 04, 2013

MEMBERS of the Shoura (Consultative) Council last week refused to pass a recommendation asking the Labour Ministry to implement two decisions issued by the Council of Ministers about nine years ago calling for introducing the system of working from the home.

Shoura members were split over the recommendation. Its proponents believed that allowing women to work from their homes would help reduce the rate of unemployment in the country while the opponents did not consider working from home a solution to the issue of joblessness in the Kingdom. They said that instead of staying at home, women should go out to work.

Full report at:

http://www.saudigazette.com.sa/index.cfm?method=home.regcon&contentid=20130604168425

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Indonesia’s Bandung Students Claim Sex Harassment by Principal

 June 04, 2013

Bandung. Three students from a Bandung vocational school visited the city mayor’s office on Monday to report their school principal for acts of sexual harassment.

The students, identified as A., M. and N.S., visited Mayor Ayi Vivananda, alongside their parents and members of the school committee who brought documents that included detailed accounts of the alleged sexual harassment, signed by four students.

Bambang Irwan, chairman of the school committee, said there may be other cases not yet reported.

Full report at:

http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/news/bandung-students-claim-sex-harassment/

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Woman Detained For Insulting Malaysian King on Facebook

 June 04, 2013

KUALA LUMPUR, June 4 — The Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission (MCMC) has detained a suspect who allegedly insulted Yang di-Pertuan Agong Tuanku Abdul Halim Mu’adzam Shah on Facebook after the King urged Malaysians to accept the Election 2013 results.

The MCMC said that with co-operation from the police, it managed to locate the woman and detain her for questioning.

“The suspect may also be charged under the Sedition Act 1948,” the MCMC said in a statement today.

“MCMC views very seriously the abuse of social media to upload content or comments containing elements of insult especially against the monarchy,” it added.

Full report at:

http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/mcmc-woman-detained-for-insulting-king-on-facebook/

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Women from poorer backgrounds are less subject to violence

4 June 2013

Women from poor backgrounds are less vulnerable to physical and verbal abuse, according to a study conducted by Salma Al-Harbi on 300 women between the ages of 30 and 34.

The study showed that women who come from poor families with an average monthly income between SR 1,000 and 1,999 are the least prone to abuse, followed by those who come from families earning between SR 4,000 and 4,999.

The highest rates of abuse were found among families earning an income of over SR 5,000.

“Women who belong to low-income families are often teachers and nurses,” Al-Harbi said.

The study showed that women between the ages of 25 and 29 are prone to more verbal abuse than of other age groups.

Full report at:

http://www.arabnews.com/news/453945

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In Afghanistan, grief for a husband who shouldn’t have died

 4 June 2013

Whenever Bibi Laila heard the all too familiar sound of a bomb blast in Jalalabad, she did not worry - her husband worked for the famously impartial Red Cross, and would never be a target.

Laila’s husband, Bashir Khan, worked in one of the world’s most dangerous vocations, a gate guard in war-wracked Afghanistan. Despite that, she believed no one would dare attack the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), given its history of working with all sides.

“My husband gave us assurances that he worked at a humanitarian organization and whenever there was fighting, they (the ICRC) collect dead bodies and help both sides, so no harm would come to him,” Laila told Reuters in the family’s two-room home outside the eastern city of Jalalabad.

Full report at:

http://english.alarabiya.net/en/perspective/profiles/2013/06/04/In-Afghanistan-grief-for-a-husband-who-shouldn-t-have-died.html

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Meet Zeynep Fadillioglu: the first woman to design a mosque in modern Turkey

BY MYRIAM ROBIN / JUN 04, 2013

In 2009, there were more than 700 new mosques built in Turkey.

But only one was designed by a woman.

Zeynep Fadillioglu was the lead architect of the Sakirin Mosque in Istanbul.

Fadillioglu, who's run her own design company for 16 years, has spent most of her career designing restaurants and hotels.

Designing a mosque was a very different project, she told the Dell Women's Entrepreneur Network Conference in Istanbul on Monday.

Full report at:

http://www.womensagenda.com.au/talking-about/world-of-women/meet-zeynep-fadillioglu-the-first-women-to-design-a-mosque-in-modern-turkey/201306032262

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Volunteers to Help Women in Saudi Grand Mosque

4 June 2013

About 300 female volunteers specializing in various medical and nursing professions have registered their particulars on the Saudi Red Crescent website. They will offer voluntary emergency services in the prayer section reserved for women at the Grand Mosque.

The team is called Rafeedah volunteer team. Some of them are seen in the picture on the left. Sana Fadhil, the team chief, said that “we seek the involvement of a larger number of female volunteers. We are placing ads and calls for help in hospitals and social networks.”

http://www.arabnews.com/news/453938

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First Saudi Sports Complex for Women Opens In Al-Khobar Province

 June 4, 2013

RIYADH: The first sports complex for women in Saudi Arabia has opened in the east of the ultra-conservative Gulf kingdom, the daily newspaper Al-Watan reported on Monday. The paper said businesswomen and women personalities attended the inauguration of the centre in Al-Khobar province after it was given the go-ahead by the authorities. Saudi Arabia, which applies a strict interpretation of Islamic or Sharia law, bans men and women mixing in public and access for women in public areas.

Full report at:

http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2013%5C06%5C04%5Cstory_4-6-2013_pg2_14

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URL: http://newageislam.com/islam,-women-and-feminism/new-age-islam-news-bureau/girls-a-burden-on-guardians-for-failing-to-manage-the-quazis-in-bangladesh/d/11890

 

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