New Age Islam
Mon Nov 23 2020, 11:02 AM

Islam, Women and Feminism ( 20 Dec 2012, NewAgeIslam.Com)

Beheading of 14-year-old Afghan girl proves violence rages there

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Putin backs ban on hijabs in schools

Canada: Top court rules judges may order witnesses to remove niqab

Amid fear of attack on students, Malala asks Pakistan not to rename college after her

Florida: woman with sword arrested at Muslim school and mosque

Iranian MP: Russian women employees at nuclear plant 'immodest'

Nigeria: Women demand rights in new constitution

Malala Yousufzai better choice as Time's 'Person of Year'

Underpaid, overworked and imperilled – the plight of lady health workers

Violence against women on rise in Sylhet

Muslims for White Ribbon Campaign-breaking the silence on violence against women

Female Muslims Decry Marginalization in Indonesia Meeting

Women’s empowerment: Govt to announce package for working women on Dec 22

Syrian Women Decry Exclusion by Islamist Opposition

Marwa Adel helps females break free from the shackles of stereotypes

Bound By Magic, Nigerian Women Enslaved

PAKISTAN: Increasing vulnerability of women and children in Pakistan

Girl killed in Sukkur as brothers fight over land

Pakistan: Women rights activists call for protection to field workers

Pakistan: Young couple killed at Sarai Kharbooza

Pakistan: Woman killed as shell hits house

Pakistani man charged with causing death of schoolgirl

Compiled by New Age Islam News Bureau

Photo: Pakistan's President Ali Zardari, Secretary-General,Irina Bokova, France's Prime Minister, Jean-Marc Ayrault, and former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, attend a ceremony at UNESCO headquarters in Paris, on Dec. 10, 2012, to honor 15-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai

URL: http://www.newageislam.com/islam,-women-and-feminism/new-age-islam-news-bureau/beheading-of-14-year-old-afghan-girl-proves-violence-rages-there/d/9756

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Beheading of 14-year-old Afghan girl proves violence rages there

Scott Peterson

 Dec 11, 2012

The poor Afghan family never took a photograph of their 14-year-old daughter, Geysina, before her life was cut short.

All the mementos of their devoted daughter fit in a single sack, carried from their village in northern Afghanistan – the totems of the latest grisly episode in a surge of killings of young women and girls in Kunduz Province. There's a pair of worn sandals repaired with loops of thick thread, which bring tears to the eyes of Geysina's father when he holds them. And there is a ring made of cheap metal – no more than costume jewelry for children – inset with a small oval of lime-green plastic.

Geysina was wearing the ring the morning in late November when she was beheaded 150 yards from home while fetching water.

"She was too young for gold," explains Geysina's father Mohamad Rahim, whose threadbare sleeves and calloused hands attest to a life spent farming. He tips his head and grey silk turban at the memories of Geysina, one of nine children whose walk, smile, and laugh set her apart. "We were all lying on the ground, crying and screaming – there is nothing like this [killing of innocents] in Islam."

Her family and local police blame a neighbor, a butcher living next door, who they say threatened Geysina's life repeatedly for not accepting several proposals for marriage to the butcher's brother – the latest rejection made just the night before the killing.

Geysina lived and died in a hard country for women, a point highlighted again by a United Nations report released today. Despite a landmark 2009 law called the "Elimination of Violence Against Women," crimes against women remain under reported and largely not investigated.

The reasons, the report states, include “cultural restraints, social norms and taboos, customary practices and religious beliefs, discrimination against women that leads to wider acceptance of violence against them … and, at times threat to life.”

In 16 provinces, the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) noted the discrepancy between the "very low" figure of 470 officially reported incidents of violence in the past year and the 4,010 recorded by the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission.

UNAMA's human rights director, Georgette Gagnon, called on Afghan authorities to "take further steps to ensure that police and prosecutors register and investigate all reports of violence against women."

Arrests in Geysina's case

In Geysina's case, the police have taken some action.

Police say the butcher, Mohamad Sadiq, and a relative and suspected accomplice, are now behind bars. They deny the murder, but were caught fleeing the scene, says Kunduz police spokesman Said Sarwar Husaini. Evidence includes bloody clothes in their possession, and the motive was well-known locally to all, due to a string of threats.

"I am sure the court will punish them," says Mr. Husaini, noting likely sentences of 20 years or life in prison. Such sentences are an increasingly common result, according to the UNAMA report. Of the 470 referred to a judicial process, some 163 saw indictments filed and 100 of those ended in convictions using the 2009 law.

"Women are always the victims, so we pursue these cases very seriously," says Husaini. "Women have a weak status in society, so we are very careful about women's cases and investigate deeply because they can't protect themselves."

Violence spikes in Kunduz

But violence against women is not showing signs of abating in Afghanistan. The acting head of women’s affairs in Laghman Province in northeast Afghanistan, Najia Sediqi, was assassinated yesterday. Her predecessor was killed last July for defending a girl who married for love, instead of an arranged marriage to an older man.

And in Kunduz, Geysina was only one among a dozen young women and girls recorded killed in the last nine months alone, compared to just one in the previous year. Police statistics show that those murders account for more than one-quarter of the 42 killings registered across the province in that period.

Residents and police in Kunduz list a host of reasons: lack of education, poverty, increased militia activity, traditional practices of forced and early marriage – and growing resistance to those practices – and even democracy, along with mental health problems stemming from decades of conflict.

"There are many reasons behind it," says Nadira Geyah, the head of the Kunduz office of the Afghan Ministry of Women’s Affairs. An Afghan flag sits on her desk, beside a group of cloth flowers in well-appointed offices. The UNAMA report noted the “crucial role” of such provincial women's affairs offices.

Most women are killed at the hands of illegal militias, which have taken root in Kunduz the last two years, says Ms. Geyah. But a tradition of forced marriages also "create problems in the family and are used as reasons to kill."

'A generation of war'

On top of that, decades of war – of Soviet occupation in the 1980s, civil war in the 1990s, and finally since 2001 American and NATO intervention – has left its mark.

"This is a generation of war, so people have mental problems and are very quick to anger and to act," says Geyah.

Yet another reason is the process of spreading the news of women's rights across the country, as the Ministry of Women's Affairs does. In Kunduz, Geyah's office uses sympathetic religious scholars to spread the message, with the help of the media. Key topics are women's rights according to Islam, under international human rights law, and Afghan prohibitions on violence against women.

"When a woman in a rural area hears that, she stands up to her family, and instead of going to a magistrate [with a problem], they may prefer to kill [the woman]," says Geyah.

Not all scholars are on board, and their preaching has also led to the killing of women. "It's a big challenge and we need more time. We should struggle against that," she adds.

Even more fundamentally, education is key. Families often prefer that their children work instead of go to school, "so what kind of behavior can we expect of them?" asks Geyah.

Geysina is a case in point: None of the nine children in the family went to school. “She was like a house girl, busy at home, cooking with her mother or bringing us lunch in the fields,” says the murdered girl’s father, Mr. Rahim. “She was not a school girl.”

Reasons for optimism

Despite the surge in killings, Geyah is optimistic about changes in coming years.

"In the past, there were a small number of girls in school, and that number is increasing," says Geyah. "And before, there were no women in Kunduz government offices; now we have many examples."

And on the ground in Kunduz, the police say they are making progress. They have stepped up arrests in the past two years, as their own capacity and numbers have grown. In the last half-year Kunduz police have investigated 500 cases, 56 of them related to murders, says Husaini. On his desk is a calendar with a photograph of a crop of uniformed women police recruits.

The death toll will drop, says Husaini, as police numbers grow, and if magistrates rule consistently: "If they give appropriate punishment, it will make a difference."

Yet those future changes, if they come, were too late for Geysina and her mourning family.

"When you would fight with her, she would come back and make peace – she was very kind," says her brother, Mohamad Noor. "These days we were getting ready for a wedding party."

"She even asked for new clothes!" says father Rahim, laughing, adding that he vetoed as inappropriate her request for a short-sleeved outfit.

The shock of her loss to this family is something Geysina's killers will never understand, he says. "Those who did this don't know anything about humanity or Islam."

Follow Scott Peterson on Twitter @peterson__scott

http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/beheading-14-year-old-afghan-girl-proves-violence-rages-there

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Putin backs ban on hijabs in schools

December 21, 2012

President Putin has said full-face veils are out of place in schools and other educational institutions.

“Even Islamic scholars in the Muslim world are saying it’s the wrong thing to do [to wear hijabs in schools]. And now you want us to introduce this tradition? what for?” Mr. Putin said at the Moscow press conference.

A school in the Russian city of Stavropol in October barred several Muslim girls from going to school in headscarves, forcing their parents to turn to public prosecutors to make the headmaster lift the ban.

Prosecutors have deemed the school’s decision valid and totally compliant with the country’s laws.

Voice of Russia, RIA

http://english.ruvr.ru/2012_12_20/Putin-backs-ban-on-hijabs-in-schools/

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Canada: Top court rules judges may order witnesses to remove niqab

But split decision favours balance between religious rights and fair trial, when possible

By Leslie MacKinnon, CBC News

 Dec 20, 2012

A Muslim woman who is the complainant in a sexual assault trial in Toronto has lost her bid before Canada's top court to have an unimpeded right to wear her niqab while testifying.

In a split Supreme Court of Canada decision released Thursday, the seven judges largely upheld a lower court's ruling that the woman, known only as N.S. to protect her identity under a court-ordered publication ban, may have to remove her niqab.

The woman has accused her uncle and cousin of sexually assaulting her when she was between six and 10 years old, during the 1980s. Twenty-five years later, the woman told her story to police and her two male relatives were charged, but the case has not yet gone to trial.

She asked to wear a niqab, a veil worn by some Muslim women that covers virtually all of the face except the eyes, during her testimony, because of what she said were sincerely held religious beliefs.

The Supreme Court ruling is being described as a 4-2-1 decision, given the differences between the judges.

Justices Louis Lebel and Marshall Rothstein ruled that she should not wear her niqab at all during testimony.

Justice Rosalie Abella went the other way in dissenting, and would have allowed the niqab except in circumstances where the identity of the witness would be at stake.

David Butt, lawyer for the Muslim woman, said Thursday his client was "thrilled with the fairness and the balance that the Supreme Court has shown in addressing what has been a very difficult case for the courts to wrestle with."

Butt, who described his client as a working mother who considers herself a survivor of childhood sexual abuse, said that she is looking forward to going back to the lower court and giving more evidence. Asked by reporters what his client would do if she were ordered to remove her niqab, Butt said that she is not, at this stage, thinking of ultimate outcomes.

Butt said that the highest court has set out guidelines, but that lawyers need examples from real cases. "This will be the first one, it will be a big one, and it will help other women going forward," he said.

The ruling largely upholds criteria established by the Ontario Court of Appeal.

The Court of Appeal had ruled the woman may have to remove her niqab if her credibility became an issue. It also set out criteria that a judge must consider:

Whether the veil interfered with the cross-examination.

Whether the witness would be appearing before a judge only or before a jury.

The nature of the evidence.

The woman, known as N.S.in the court, appealed to the Supreme Court arguing her sincere religious beliefs meant that her face must be covered before all males who are not close relatives.

Lawyers for the two men accused of sexually assaulting her when she was a child argued that a fair and open trial means the face of a witness must be seen because facial cues are important to establish credibility.

The case now goes back to the preliminary inquiry stage, where it is possible the woman may be forced to testify with her face uncovered.

The majority judges allowed that "scientific exploration" in future cases about cues given by the face of a witness may enhance or diminish the arguments made in this particular case. But, they added, "It may be ventured that where the liberty of the accused is at stake, the witness's evidence is central to the case, and her credibility vital, the possibility of a wrongful conviction must weigh heavily in the balance, favouring removal of the niqab."

'The niqab undermines gender equality'

Tyler Hodgson, lawyer for the Muslim Canadian Congress, an intervenor in the Supreme Court case, said that the congress is pleased with the decision. His client, he said, "would probably tell you that the niqab is not something that has its roots in the Islamic tradition, and generally speaking they find that the niqab undermines gender equality."

Hodgson said "our reading of [the decision] is that the majority of times going forward in a criminal setting the witness will likely be asked to remove the niqab." This would be especially true if the evidence was contested, Hodgson said, adding that in a criminal case, evidence is always contested.

Susan Chapman, lawyer for LEAF, the Women's Legal Education and Action Fund, reads the case differently. "The starting proposition here is that she's entitled to wear it [the niqab] until somebody demonstrates, namely the accused, that it will impact adversely on his fair trial rights ...The onus I see is on the accused."

But Chapman is bothered by the fact that she feels the defence has been given a big leg-up: "The Supreme Court has said demeanor matters." Chapman said she was disappointed that the top court relied on tradition, in going by the common law practice that faces are seen in a courtroom.

"We live in a multicultural society. The fact that something is tradition is not an adequate answer to a human rights question," Chapman said.

She also said that now a woman who wears a niqab will have to make a decision: "Do I seek justice or am I going to respect my religion?"

"That's a big price to pay for justice," Chapman said.

Case presented legal dilemma

The case of N.S. presented a legal dilemma: on the one side is a religious belief said to be sincerely held, and on the other, there's the right of an accused to a full defence.

At a preliminary hearing, the woman explained she cannot show her face to any men who are not close relatives. The judge took brief unsworn evidence from her while her face remained covered, but did not allow counsel to examine her or call any evidence. The woman was ordered to remove her niqab in order to testify in court.

She objected to that judge's order and appealed.

Ontario's Superior Court first ruled, and then the Ontario Court of Apeal upheld a decision that quashed the first judge's order to remove her face covering.

Lawyers for the accused men argued that facial cues "can be significant information that help the observer understand what a witness is attempting to communicate and get a sense of who the witness is and how he or she is reacting to questioning."

The accused men’s lawyers also say that it is not clear whether the woman sees her niqab as a religious requirement, or as "a personal preference and a matter of comfort."

Removed niqab on other occasions

Part of the court evidence is that the woman did remove her niqab to be photographed for a driver's licence, in front of a female photographer. Lawyers for the accused men point out that her religious convictions were not so strong that she refused to go through the licensing process, even though the photo could be demanded by any number of police officers who might be men.

The Muslim Canadian Congress also argued that since N.S. had willingly removed her niqab for a driver's licence photo, and had testified she would also remove it at a border crossing, then the courtroom also ought to be an exemption.

But, the woman's lawyer argued that having a photograph taken for a driver's licence is not analogous to testifying about intimate sexual details in a courtroom in front of strangers.

"What is religion for if not to bring comfort?” Butt argued.

Butt told CBC that the job of the court is not to be the arbiter of whether the practice of Islam really does require that women be completely covered. Although he conceded many see it as a symbol of female oppression, he thinks an order to remove it is another form of paternalism.

"At the centre is the notion of choice ... some people's choices will be distasteful to others," the lawyer said.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/12/20/pol-supreme-court-niqab-ruling.html

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Amid fear of attack on students, Malala asks Pakistan not to rename college after her

November 21, 2012

An official says Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban for promoting girls’ education, has urged Pakistan to reverse a decision to rename a college in her honour to avert militant attacks on students.

The 15-year-old who became a symbol of youth resistance to the Taliban made the request after students broke into the school, tore down Malala’s pictures and boycotted classes in her home town of Mingora. They say renaming the college endangers their lives.

Senior government official Kamran Rehman said on Friday Malala called him from London, where she is being treated for critical wounds from the attack on Oct. 9. The Taliban said it targeted her for promoting education for secular girls.

Malala’s case won worldwide recognition for the struggle for women’s rights in Pakistan.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/international/amid-fear-of-attack-on-students-malala-asks-pakistan-not-to-rename-college-after-her/article4225382.ece

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Florida: woman with sword arrested at Muslim school and mosque

November 21, 2012

(Ahlul Bayt News Agency) - Just before 10 a.m. Wednesday, Orange County deputies responded to the Leaders Preparatory School on North Goldenrod Road, which includes a mosque, school and day care.

They found 47-year-old Dominique Eloi walking out of the mosque carrying the weapon.

A school employee said Eloi exited her vehicle with the 2-foot sword and did not respond to the employee when asked what business she had on the property.

Leaders Preparatory was immediately placed on lockdown as the employee called deputies.

Eloi was arrested and charged with possession of a weapon on school grounds, disrupting a school function and aggravated assault with a weapon.

http://abna.ir/data.asp?lang=3&Id=373841

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Iranian MP: Russian women employees at nuclear plant 'immodest'

Islamic Republic's official complains that though paid to uphold modesty laws, Russian women working at Bushehr reactor appear in public uncovered

Dudi Cohen

November 21, 2012

A member of the Iranian Parliament expressed his disapproval Thursday of the immodest attire of Russian women working at the Bushehr nuclear facility.

 According to the parliament member, the women were receiving extra payment to dress in accordance with Islamic modesty laws, specifically referring to the demand that women's heads be covered in a hijab. 

Full report at:

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4322538,00.html

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Nigeria: Women demand rights in new constitution

 21 DECEMBER 2012

THE womenfolk might have decided to take advantage of the ongoing public hearing by the National Assembly to alter the 1999 Constitution, to push for some changes on their case. Their intention was made public recently when a group of women organisations under the auspices of United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Gender and Constitution Reforms in Nigeria (GECORN), met in Lagos.

Full report at:

http://www.ngrguardiannews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=108272: -------------

 

Malala Yousufzai better choice as Time's 'Person of Year'

 12/20/2012

Time magazine names its entity of the year at this time, mostly to generate conversation and controversy regarding the choice.

It is no surprise that President Barack Obama was designated as the "Person of the Year" for 2012. He was similarly honored in 2008 following his first election.

This is not a particularly politically motivated decision. George W. Bush earned the distinction twice for his elections; and every president since Franklin Roosevelt has been so named at least once and often multiple times.

Full report at:

http://www.ldnews.com/ci_22229025/malala-yousufzai-better-choice-times-person-year?source=most_viewed

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Underpaid, overworked and imperilled – the plight of lady health workers

December 20, 2012

Farhat Sultana, 40, has had stones and tennis balls hurled at her, wolf whistles blown by none other than the fathers whose children she vaccinated, even cheap one-liners like “humein katray kyun nahin pilati?” (Why don’t you administer the drops to us), followed by winks and guffaws.

Having risen to be a lady health supervisor (LHS), she is now area in-charge of the anti-polio campaign in Baldia Town and has been working with polio immunisation since 1994, when the programme started.

Full report at:

http://dawn.com/2012/12/20/underpaid-overworked-and-imperilled-the-plight-of-lady-health-workers/

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Violence against women on rise in Sylhet

 December 21, 2012

Incidents of violence against women have marked a sharp rise in Sylhet in the last 11 months.

At least 450 cases for torture on women were filed under the Women and Children Repression Prevention Act in the district during the time and the figure is around 150 more than that of the corresponding period of the last year.

Full report at:

http://www.thedailystar.net/newDesign/news-details.php?nid=261936

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Muslims for White Ribbon Campaign-breaking the silence on violence against women

Posted Dec 20, 2012    

Muslims for White Ribbon Campaign-breaking the silence on violence against women

“Domestic violence and, the extreme practice of killing to “restore family honor” clearly violates a non-negotiable Islamic principle, and should be categorically condemned”

Anas ibn Malik, a Companion of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) once said, “I have never seen anyone kinder to one’s family than the Prophet Muhammad.” (Sahih Muslim).

This kindness is something to reflect upon as Muslims listen to Imams across the country today delivering sermons for the Friday prayer, and raising awareness on the serious issue of violence against women in Canada.

Full report at:

http://theamericanmuslim.org/tam.php/features/articles/muslims-for-white-ribbon-campaign-breaking-the-silence-on-violence-against/0019571

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Female Muslims Decry Marginalization in Indonesia Meeting

November 21, 2012  

Jakarta, Dec 20 (Prensa Latina) Islamic organization Hizbut Tahrir is set to hold an International Women''s Conference on December 22 at Sahid Jaya Hotel, Jakarta and its main theme will be women marginalization.

The Conference will discuss the causes of and solutions to desperate poverty, widespread exploitation, and general economic oppression affecting millions of women across the Muslim world and globally.

Full report at:

http://www.plenglish.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=828271&Itemid=1

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Women’s empowerment: Govt to announce package for working women on Dec 22

 December 21, 2012

BAHAWALPUR: The Punjab government will announce a special package for working women on December 22, Parveen Masood Bhatti, a Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz MNA said on Thursday.

Addressing a seminar for working women at the Rasheedia Auditorium in Bahawalpur, Bhatti said the package would allow women to obtain easy loans from Punjab Bank.

Full report at:

http://tribune.com.pk/story/482180/womens-empowerment-govt-to-announce-package-for-working-women-on-dec-22/

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Syrian Women Decry Exclusion by Islamist Opposition

By Adel Mansur

December 21, 2012

Syrian women in the struggle against President Bashar al-Assad's regime are outraged by the rise of fundamentalist Islamists in the opposition. These men, they say, are marginalizing women who helped bring the revolution to this brink of victory.

NEAR DAMASCUS, Syria (WOMENSENEWS)-- As the Syrian opposition edges closer to winning the civil war, some women who have been active in the struggle say a steady rise of fundamentalist Islamists within their movement is spoiling the sense of victory.

Full report at:

http://womensenews.org/story/war/121220/syrian-women-decry-exclusion-islamist-opposition#.UNQEZ-SE3AM

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Marwa Adel helps females break free from the shackles of stereotypes

Published December 20th, 2012

In ‘The Journey’, Marwa Adel rebels against the stories of traditional femininity and the glorified institution of marriage, to which girls passionately, yet blindly, aspire to from the day they are born.

Born in 1984 in Cairo, Adel uses photography and graphic design to tackle controversial issues in contemporary Egyptian society. Adel’s work is largely autobiographical; in The Journey, she communicates her feelings and frustrations at living in a society that, as she perceives it, strips women of freedom and choice.

Full report at:

 http://www.albawaba.com/entertainment/marwa-adel-458280

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Bound By Magic, Nigerian Women Enslaved

Heather Murdock

November 21, 2012

BENIN CITY, NIGERIA — Tens of thousands of Nigerian women are bonded to sexual servitude in Europe through the use of local magic called juju.  Lured out of Nigeria with promises of lucrative jobs, women find themselves forced to work grueling hours as prostitutes.  Most of the victims are from Edo State.

Here in Benin City, it seems that everyone knows a girl who was or is in Europe.

Many have been away for a long time.  Others are back with harrowing tales.  They talk about deadly travels through the desert, forced prostitution, arrest, imprisonment and ultimately deportation, penniless, back to the extreme poverty they fled with such high hopes.

Full report at:

http://www.voanews.com/content/bound-by-magic-nigerian-women-enslaved/1550387.html

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PAKISTAN: Increasing vulnerability of women and children in Pakistan

Contributors: Amir Murtaza

December 21, 2012

The vulnerability of innocent women and children has been astonishingly increased in Pakistan in past several months as the country has witnessed some deadly and planned attacks on unarmed women and children from militants.

On 18 December, Five Polio lady health workers were killed in Karachi and Peshawar, while two of their male colleagues received injuries during the attacks. The deceased were the part of a three-day national immunization campaign for the eradication of deadly Polio virus in Pakistan. The last few years have witnessed increase resistance against the Polio immunization over false pretexts, more so in certain parts of the country than the others. But the recent attack in Karachi, the most cosmopolitan city of Pakistan has proved that it is not the disease, but the diseased mindset, which is the main hurdle against the eradication of the deadly virus.

Full report at:

http://www.humanrights.asia/news/forwarded-news/AHRC-FAT-056-2012

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Girl killed in Sukkur as brothers fight over land

December 21, 2012

SUKKUR: Clash between two brothers over a piece of land claimed life of their sister in Dadu on Thursday.

Police said that in the limits of Dadu, two bothers Hajan Panhwar and Dhani Bakhsh Panhwar clashed over possession of a piece land.

Their sister Iqbal was killed in exchange of and eight others were injured. Police shifted the body and injured to a local hospital.

Police said that the deceased had attempted to get ceasefire between her brothers, but she lost her life in this effort.

 http://www.thenews.com.pk/Todays-News-2-149618-Girl-killed-in-Sukkur-as-brothers-fight-over-land

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Pakistan: Women rights activists call for protection to field workers

 December 21, 2012

HYDERABAD: A large number of women activists staged protest demonstrations to condemn the killing of vaccination workers in Karachi and parts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa on Thursday. They demanded providing protection to the women workforce.

The organisers included Sindhiani Tehreek, Aurat Foundation, Women Action Forum (WAF) and others. They were led by Umra Samo, Amar Sindhu and others.

Full report at:

 http://www.thenews.com.pk/Todays-News-2-149619-Women-rights-activists-call-for-protection-to-field-workers

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Pakistan: Young couple killed at Sarai Kharbooza

Shakeel Anjum

 December 21, 2012

Islamabad: A young couple was slaughtered in their house at Sarai-e-Kharbooza, but the killers left their one-year-old daughter alive in the wee hours of Thursday.

The couple tied the nuptial knot two years back and had been living at Sarai-e-Kharbooza since then.

The neighbours learnt about the incident when at about 10 a.m. a woman of the street, upon listening to the cries of their daughter, knocked at the couple’s door. After getting no response from inside, she entered into the house and found the husband and wife slaughtered.

Full report at:

http://www.thenews.com.pk/Todays-News-6-149557-Young-couple-killed-at-Sarai-Kharbooza

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Pakistan: Woman killed as shell hits house

 December 21, 2012

BARA: A woman was killed when a mortar shell fired from an unidentified location hit a house in Shinkamar area of Bara tehsil in Khyber Agency on Thursday, tribal sources said.

The sources said that the mortar shell fell on the house of one Neel Akbar in Shinkamar area populated by Zawdin, a sub-branch of Zakhakhel Afridi, in which a woman was critically injured. The injured woman died on way to the hospital, the sources added.

Zakhakhel tribe is running an armed Lashkar named as Tauheedul Islam against its rival Lashkar-e-Islam for the last two years.

 http://www.thenews.com.pk/Todays-News-7-149593-Woman-killed-as-shell-hits-house

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Pakistani man charged with causing death of schoolgirl

December 18, 2012

KOTA KINABALU, Dec 18 — A Pakistani man pleaded not guilty in the Sessions Court here today to a charge of causing the death of a 16-year-old schoolgirl in Kota Marudu last month.

Amir Ali Khan Nawaty, 40, is charged with causing the death of Norikoh Saliwa in a lorry at Km2.8 Jalan Kota Marudu-Langkon between 11am and 12.30pm on November 25.

Full report at:

http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/pakistani-man-charged-with-causing-death-of-schoolgirl/

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