New Age Islam
Fri Aug 14 2020, 03:46 PM

Islam, Women and Feminism ( 27 Apr 2010, NewAgeIslam.Com)

Shabana Azmi: Star of India

Saudi Arabia: men and women can pray together

Suntanned women face arrest in Iran

Istanbul: Islamic clothing - modesty with high fashion

The Seismic Impact of the Boobquake Movement

'Boobquake' triggered Taiwan tremor?

A Jihad for gender equality

Veiled threat of a secular society

My Talk with Mary Apick -- Iran, Women's Rights and More

French PM Announces Anti-Niqab Law for July

Muslim says mistresses are the French way of life

Siddiqui: Picking on Muslim women smacks of hypocrisy

Sudan not abridging women's rights

The Pakistani woman’s crusade against the system

M'sia's women-only trains

Let Muslim women wear head scarves

Woman prof shot dead in Pak

Nawaz slams killing of woman educationist in Quetta

BLA claims responsibility for killing professor in Quetta

Palestinian girls get ticket to Intel science fair

Compiled by New Age Islam News Bureau

URL: http://www.newageislam.com/islam,-women-and-feminism/shabana-azmi--star-of-india/d/2772

 

-------

Shabana Azmi: star of India

By Paul Kendall

28 Apr 2010

Things are not what they appear to be in the new film by Gurinder Chadha, the director of Bend It Like Beckham and Bride and Prejudice.

A plump Punjabi housewife from Ealing, who fusses over her children and spends most of her time in the kitchen making curries and pakoras, is actually a serial killer, using her culinary know-how to bump off people who have refused to help find a suitor for her single daughter.

That’s the central joke in It’s A Wonderful Afterlife and if you know any plump Punjabi housewives from Ealing, it’s a pretty funny one.

But, even more surprising than the identity of the murderer is that of the actress who plays her: Shabana Azmi. For, in India, Azmi is an absolute megastar.

The winner of five National Awards, the subcontinent’s answer to the Oscars, and a pioneer of the New Wave cinema of the Eighties that challenged many of India’s most deeply held prejudices, 59-year-old Azmi is a revered figure among the general public and India’s political elite.

She’s a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations, a former member of parliament and a recipient of the International Gandhi Peace Prize, which she won for a 20-year campaign on behalf of slum-dwellers.

She is, in other words, a million miles from a middle-class housewife living in the suburbs of Greater London and now she is playing that role in a low-budget British farce. How did this happen?

‘I agreed to the film as soon as Gurinder asked,’ Azmi says from her home in Bombay. ‘I’d watched Bend It Like Beckham and had liked it very much and I really wanted to work with her.’

What’s more, Azmi is now at a Meryl Streep stage in her career where, having done more than 140 films and won every major award going, she no longer has to be strategic about her choices. It’s A Wonderful Afterlife is Azmi’s Mamma Mia!.

Which doesn’t mean she didn’t take the role seriously.

Azmi went to astonishing lengths to transform herself into a typical British Punjabi woman, first asking Chadha to introduce her to some of her family (the director comes from a large Punjabi family in Southall) and then spending several days at their houses observing everything from how they dressed and walked to their turns of phrase and facial expressions.

Azmi also brushed up on her cooking so that she would appear comfortable in a kitchen (in reality Azmi admits to being a terrible cook) and donned a variety of cheap salwar kameez and acrylic cardigans picked up from market stalls in Southall, old-fashioned glasses and a navy blue coat from BHS.

To complete the look, the actress put on almost two stone in weight.

‘Of all the women I met, I didn’t meet a single slim one,’ she explains. ‘Also, I had to be plump because my daughter in the film is overweight and it wouldn’t look believable if I was thin.’

Throughout the story, Roopi, the daughter, is the butt of endless jokes about her size, which is said to be the main reason for her unhappy (read single) life.

That and her audacious decision to have a proper career (she works in a shelter for abused women). One suspects there is more than a slice of Chadha’s own lifestory in here, but Azmi relates to it, too.

‘I have many, many friends who are going bananas about getting their daughters married and many of the girls are slightly overweight,’ she says.

‘All of them are made to lose their weight to get a husband. Once their daughters turn 30, that seems to be the age after which Indian mothers suddenly go crazy.’

The whole point of their existence, in the eyes of their parents, is to get hitched and have children. But that is changing fast.

‘Lots of girls are putting their foot down and saying: “We are not going to be rushed into marriage. We are going to carry on with our career.” And that means the age of marriage is getting later and later.

'On one level that is good – it helps stabilise the population. But on the other hand, by 32, all the eligible boys are taken. Then what do you do, except worry about it incessantly?’

The fact that young Indian women enjoy more freedom today is thanks, in no small way, to Azmi.

The daughter of bohemian parents – her father was a famous Urdu poet, her mother, an acclaimed actress – she learnt at an early age to believe in the power of art to bring about social and cultural change.

After university she studied at the Film and Television Institute of India and in her first major film, Ankur (The Seedling), in 1974, she played a peasant woman who sleeps with her landlord and finds herself pregnant.

Her lover jilts her and she retaliates by calling for the overthrow of the feudal system. The performance won her the first of her five Best Actress awards.

The second, eight years later, was for Arth (The Meaning) in which she played a suburban wife whose husband has an affair.

Again, she is abandoned, but in this film, the man returns home, apologises for what he has done and asks her to take him back. But she refuses; a sensational choice for an Indian woman at that time.

Arth turned Azmi into a figurehead for the country’s nascent feminist movement and she soon became involved in political campaigning.

Three years later, she came face-to-face with the plight of India’s underclass. A slum-dweller whom she was using as a role model for a part she was playing in a film invited her to her house and Azmi was shocked by the woman’s living conditions.

As she recalled years later: ‘There was no water, no electricity, no air. I was completely amazed that somebody who was living in such torturous circumstances had the generosity to become my friend.’

The experience changed her life. She joined a group called Nivara Hakk (The Right To Shelter) and in 1986 Azmi and four other campaigners staged a five-day hunger strike in the middle of one of Bombay’s busiest streets.

The protest, which made headlines around India, carved her name into the hearts of rich and poor alike.

Since then, she has campaigned relentlessly for better conditions for slum-dwellers and established herself as a moderniser, speaking out against religious extremism and the rigid dictates of gender, caste and class.

‘You can’t play a person who is fighting injustice from nine to five and then go home to air-conditioned comfort and not concern yourself with the life of the person you’ve just played,’ she says.

Some have been cynical about Azmi’s campaigning. She enjoys the material benefits of fame and wealth and can be rather grand and diva-ish.

But Azmi’s dedication to her causes over so many years and her stint as a politician (she was an independent in the Upper House of the Indian Parliament for six years) suggest there is substance behind the public proclamations.

She has also had her principles tested in the face of some frightening zealotry, from both Hindu and Islamic fundamentalists.

The Hindu attacks came after she starred in Fire, a film about a woman who has a lesbian relationship with her sister-in-law. The first Indian film to explicitly portray homosexual relations, it was passed by the censors but was condemned by extremist Hindu parties.

Mobs attacked a cinema and Azmi was accused of being ‘wicked’ and ‘criminal’. Two years later, they struck again while Azmi was making a follow-up, Water, in the city of Varanasi.

Activists claimed (wrongly) that the film was depicting widows as prostitutes and denigrating the Hindu religion. Filming was abandoned. (The project was finally made six years later with different actors.)

The most vociferous Islamic attack upon Azmi came after 9/11. Invited to take part in a live television debate, the actress was appalled to hear a Muslim cleric call on Indian Muslims to join the jihad in Afghanistan.

Azmi turned to him and said: ‘Fine. Why don’t we airdrop you into Kandahar now and you can wage holy war yourself?’

He replied: ‘I won’t respond to singing, dancing whores.’ After that she was advised to double her security.

But she won’t be cowed. Although it’s safe to say that her appearance in It’s A Wonderful Afterlife won’t put her in any danger, the same cannot be said for her next project – the lead in a film about the late prime minister of Pakistan, Benazir Bhutto, which is unsettling the current Pakistani government.

‘I don’t look for controversy,’ she says. ‘But if I believe something needs to be said, then I will say it. Some might be shocked, or angry or confused, but they start asking questions and that is the first step on the road to progress.’

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/bollywood/7635157/Shabana-Azmi-star-of-India.html

------

Saudi Arabia: Head of the religious police in Mecca, men and women can pray together

28 Apr 2010

Riyadh - The Saudi official news agency, SPA, had reported his dismissal only to delete all reports a few hours later, a fatwa says "he should be killed," the Grand Mufti has denied his authority to speak about Islamic law. He, Ahmed al Ghamdi (pictured), head of the religious police in Mecca, the first holy city of Islam, confirms his convictions: men and women can pray together and meet freely, even if only in public.

The episode has been strictly censored by Saudi Arabia, monitored by the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice, the official name of the muttawa, the religious police. Of which Ghamdi is a senior official.

The question of the possibility of men and women “mixing” - in public, never in private - has for weeks been at the centre of a debate between scholars and politicians. Thus, the Saudi newspaper The National, has devoted a long article to the story, recalling the words of the Justice Minister Muhammad al Issa who warned against confusing public promiscuity, which he believes is allowed by Islam, with meetings in private between men and women who are neither married nor related by kinship, which is prohibited.

The problem is not merely one of religious tradition, it also has economic implications. The ban has in fact heavy negative influences on women's employment and foreign investment since it requires gender division even in the offices of international companies.

So, since December, when Ghamdi first spoke out on the issue, the question has occupied newspapers and television programs. A debate which is due to the climate of moderate reforms that King Abdullah is introducing into the country in an attempt to modernize it.

But the reaction of conservatives has been very hard. If Ghamdhi argues that the division did not exist at the time of Mohammed his opposers cry of violations of Sharia and apostasy. Sheikh Abdulrahman Al Barrak has issued a fatwa which says that promiscuity "as supported by modernists" is prohibited because it allows "the sight of what is forbidden and prohibited conversations between men and women." Anyone who facilitates such promiscuity is an infidel", and if not retracted "should be killed".  And finally, anyone who allows his daughter, sister or wife to work with men or to attend a mixed school is guilty of "a kind of prostitution".

On Sunday, the case seemed closed. The Commission's website published a statement from its Chairman Sheikh Abdulaziz al-Humain according to which Ghamdhi had been replaced. The statement was picked up and reported by SPA.  Soon after, however, the agency wrote that the news was to be "deleted and not used".

http://www.speroforum.com/site/article.asp?id=31722&t=Saudi+Arabia:+++Head+of+the+religious+police+in+Mecca,+men+and+women+can+pray+together

-------

Suntanned women face arrest in Iran

28 Apr 2010

LONDON: Suntanned women and girls who are like "walking mannequins" will be arrested in Iran, Tehran's police chief has warned.

The warning comes close on the heels of a hardline Iranian cleric claiming that immodestly dressed women disturbed young men and caused earthquakes.

"The public expects us to act firmly and swiftly if we see any social misbehaviour by women, and men, who defy our Islamic values. In some areas of north Tehran we can see many suntanned women and young girls who look like walking mannequins.

"We are not going to tolerate this situation and will first warn those found in this manner and then arrest and imprison them," The Telegraph Wednesday quoted Brig Hossien Sajedinia, Tehran's police chief, as saying.

A preacher has also told the residents of Iran's capital Tehran to leave the city.

"Go on the streets and repent for your sins. A holy torment is upon us. Leave town," said Ayatollah Aziz Khoshvaqt during a recent sermon in northern Tehran.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/middle-east/Suntanned-women-face-arrest-in-Iran-/articleshow/5867055.cms

-------

In Istanbul, Islamic clothing for women combines modesty with high fashion

By Monique Jaques

28 Apr 2010

At an Istanbul fashion show befitting Paris or Milan, Islamic clothing designers show off apparel for women that combines modesty with high fashion.

At a large convention center here, models prepare for the annual Islamic fashion show. While this type of dress may be commonplace in conservative areas in this country, it is definitely new to the models.

Amid the backstage chaos, Venezuelan model Christina says that while she doesn’t really understand all this, as she comes from a much more liberal place, it’s a job and she’s happy to work. Most of the models here are hired on three-month contracts from around the world and brought to Istanbul - many for the first time. A South African model remarks that she’s never even seen a head scarf before as a cluster of tiny women from the design company engulfs her to help her dress.

Full report at:

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Middle-East/2010/0427/In-Istanbul-Islamic-clothing-for-women-combines-modesty-with-high-fashion

-------

The Seismic Impact of the Boobquake Movement

Jessica Ramirez

28 Apr 2010

Jennifer McCreight did not mean to make the Internet freak out over boobs and earthquakes. In fact, what we now know as the Boobquake movement started out as a boob joke. Last week, amid college homework, McCreight came across a comment by Iranian cleric Hojatoleslam Kazem Sedighi, who was quoted as saying, “Many women who do not dress modestly...lead young men astray, corrupt their chastity, and spread adultery in society, which increases earthquakes." That’s right, bad girls literally make tectonic plates shift in discomfort, causing the earth to quake. (And here I thought earth-shattering was supposed to be a good thing.) 

Full report at:

http://blog.newsweek.com/blogs/techtonicshifts/archive/2010/04/27/the-seismic-impact-of-the-boobquake-movement.aspx

-------

'Boobquake' triggered Taiwan tremor?

Apr 28, 2010

SAN FRANCISCO: Breasts were big on Facebook on Monday as a female blogger called on women to prove wrong an Iranian cleric who preached that cleavage causes earthquakes.

As a cyber-organized event dubbed "Boobquake" got underway, a temblor measuring 6.5 on the Richter scale hit Taiwan prompting playful online banter about whether there was merit to the cleric's contention.

More than 55,000 people were backing the official "Boobquake" page of Jennifer McCreight, a self-described "geeky, perverted atheist feminist" putting her D-cup breasts where her mouth is.

Full report at:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/us/Boobquake-triggered-Taiwan-tremor/articleshow/5866184.cms

-------

A Jihad for gender equality

By Kashif-ul-Huda

28 Apr 2010

Nasiruddin Haider Khan is in Hindi journalism since 1992 and currently work as Deputy Resident Editor of Dainik Hindustan in Agra. He has been working on gender issues especially Muslim women issues for the last 16 years. Mr. Khan has a diploma in Journalism from Indian Institute of Mass communication and MA in Womens studies from Lucknow University.

In 2005 he got the opportunity to look closely into Muslim women and reproductive rights issues under Health and Population Innovation Fellowship (HPIF). He has traveled to various parts of India, Egypt, Malaysia, Bangladesh, and Pakistan for an in-depth study. As a result of his research he has launched a website called GenderJihad.in. He talked to TwoCircles.net about his work.

Why Gender Jihad? The word "jihad" has got violent images attached to it these days; why did you choose this word?

Gender Jihad!!! Yes, Gender Jihad! Jihad for gender equality. Precisely, a struggle to end gender discrimination.

Full report at:

http://twocircles.net/2010apr26/jihad_gender_equality.html

-------

Veiled threat of a secular society

By Emma Alberici

28 Apr 2010

One of the privileges of being a journalist is that you're routinely invited into people's homes and get the opportunity to glimpse into a way of life you might otherwise have never been witness to at such close range. That's certainly how I felt as we journeyed to the south of Paris to meet Soraya Khedrouche.

When she opened the door to her home, she was wearing a burka. Even though I was expecting to see her like that, it still shocked me. This imposing black apparition gliding across the parquet floor seemed out of place in the small three bedroom council flat she shares with her husband and five children. The 34-year-old wouldn't normally wear the burka at home nor would she wear it for an audience of women but I was accompanied by two men (cameraman David Martin and producer Greg Wilesmith) and revealing herself to them is strictly forbidden according to her version of Islam.

There are only vague references to the burka in the Koran. In the Penguin English translation it says that a woman must be discreet and cover her hair. During our interview, Soraya points out that the Muslim holy book also asks followers to lead their lives as the Prophet Mohammed did. The Prophet's wives all wore the full veil. She wants to live a life like theirs.

Full report at:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/04/28/2884491.htm?site=thedrum

-------

My Talk with Mary Apick -- Iran, Women's Rights and More

Alex Geana

28 Apr 2010

Mary Apick at The National Arts Club to explore her Islamic culture, the fall of the Iranian Shah and the brutal quashing of the budding green movement.

She takes the stage this Sunday April 25th at Alice Tully hall in Lincoln Center for the 19th production of, "Beneath the Veil", the play she wrote. It comes to New York from the Kennedy Center and has taken six months to mount.

Like many historical fashion pieces, the veil is steeped in tradition and symbolism, originally meant to hide the haram from prying eyes and keep them safe from wiley stable hands. Mary explains that because of the many wars of yesteryear in the Middle East, many men died in combat leaving women and daughters uncared for. The system of marriage evolved to protect these widows and outcasts. But like most things, turned into a system that was used to subjugate and control.

Full report at:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alex-geana/my-talk-with-mary-apick_b_546663.html

-------

French PM Announces Anti-Niqab Law for July

By Aurelien Girard

28 Apr 2010

PARIS—French Prime Minister François Fillon announced to Parliament on April 27 that by next July his government would push for a new law prohibiting full head-coverings. The Muslim face-veils, called the niqab or burqa, are described by women's right defenders as “walking prisons.”

Fillon did not say whether the law would follow an “emergency procedure” that would allow it to be passed by a single vote in Parliament before being reviewed by the Senate. Such a decision would be unwelcome, claim Parliament and Senate Presidents Bernard Accoyer and Gerard Larcher, who wish both chambers examine the law twice so as to ensure due process.

President of the French Socialist Party Jean-Marc Ayrault, currently in opposition, initially criticized the law but finally said he would not oppose the vote, under two conditions: that the “emergency procedure” would not be used, and that the advice of the Council of State, a high-level legal advisory body to the government, would be taken into consideration.

The Council stated on March 30 that such a law could very likely betray the spirit of the French Constitution, and finds only weak legal support.

Full report at:

http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/content/view/34261/

-------

Muslim says mistresses are the French way of life

April 28, 2010

A Muslim Frenchman at the center of a firestorm over polygamy said Monday that keeping mistresses is the French way of life.

The man's case came to light after his wife was fined for driving with a veil covering her face, and his comments are an ironic riposte to those in French President Nicolas Sarkozy's government who want to push immigrants to better integrate into French society.

The 31-year-old Frenchwoman drew nationwide attention last week to a driving fine she received for apparel that hinders her vision. But it soon emerged that her husband may have four wives _ although it was doubtful the marriages were made official under French law.

The situation appeared to be a boon to Sarkozy, who is trying to rush through controversial legislation forbidding burqa-style Islamic veils that cover the face, on the grounds that they don't respect French values or women's dignity. But it has stoked debate and may backfire on legal grounds.

Full report at:

http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2010/apr/28/muslim-says-mistresses-are-the-french-way-of-life/

-------

Siddiqui: Picking on Muslim women smacks of hypocrisy

By Haroon Siddiqui

28 Apr 2010

I do not like the niqab/burqa. It makes me uncomfortable. But that's not a good enough reason to argue that it be banned or, worse, that those wearing it be denied public services, including education and even health care, as Quebec is proposing.

Based on even majority public opinion, a democracy cannot discriminate because of dress – religiously dictated or otherwise. It couldn't do it in the same way that it wouldn't sanction lynching, should the masses be baying for it. The rule of law wouldn't have it.

What if society collectively decided to change the law to permit lynching? It could. But citizens would retain the right to argue that such a law would be an ass.

That's the stage we are at vis-à-vis Quebec's bill on the niqab. Hence the myriad arguments.

• The niqab is just another manifestation of multiculturalism gone mad.

No, it is a case of freedom of religion, which includes "the right to show it," as Quebec's own commission on reasonable accommodation said in its 2008 report.

Full report at:

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/789267--siddiqui-picking-on-muslim-women-smacks-of-hypocrisy

-------

Sudan not abridging women's rights

By Juma Kwayera

28 Apr 2010

Khartoum, Sudan - Journalist Lubna Hussein elicited unprecedented international attention when she allegedly challenged traditional African and Islamic religious edicts on women's dressing, painting her society as conservative, unprogressive and unresponsive to individual liberties and rights.

Lubna, who in the eyes of Western human rights activists is a martyr, lost her job at the United Nations, where she was a communications officer, after she was arrested and charged with 'unbecoming dressing' for wearing tr ousers

The controversy earned her an invitation to the French Elyse Palace for a meetin g with French President Nicholas Sarkozy for challenging Islam on women's rights.

Although she does not speak a word of French, since her being subjected to 40 st rokes of the cane, she has published a book in the language on the suppression of women's rights in her country.

Full report at:

http://www.afriquejet.com/news/africa-news/sudan-not-abridging-women's-rights-2010042748396.html

-------

The Pakistani woman’s crusade against the system

By Sadef A. Kully

28 Apr 2010

KARACHI: Although, it has been twenty something odd years since Dr. Kauser Saeed Khan has been participating in and witnessing women protest for equal rights, there still seems to be some fight left in her…probably more than just some.

“We are not going to be quiet, or give up,” said Dr. Khan, one of the founding members of Women’s Action Forum (WAF), who is an Associate Professor at the Department of Community Health in Aga Khan University.

The women’s movement in Pakistan started with one woman, who married a young man against her parents’ wishes. She had committed Zina (adultery) according to the Hudood Ordinance, and her punishment was to be flogged in public.

“[WAF] actually started when a colleague called a meeting and said enough is enough, what is happening here,” said Dr. Khan. “We got women together from various organizations including individual women and from that group came WAF.”

Full report at:

http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect/dawn-content-library/dawn/news/pakistan/metropolitan/21-The-Pakistani-womans-crusade-against-the-system-sk-06

-------

M'sia's women-only trains

28 Apr 2010

KUALA LUMPUR - MALAYSIA has launched pink women-only train coaches to prevent sexual harassment and to give Muslim women the option of travelling separately from men, officials said on Wednesday.

Malaysian Railway offers the special service on a route between Kuala Lumpur and the western port city of Klang, and plans to expand it to another route in two weeks' time, acting general manager Mohamad Hider Yusof told AFP.

'We can improve the comfort and the safety of female passengers with this implementation and at the same time prevent sexual harassment,' he added.

'We are a multiracial nation and the majority of the population are Muslims, so this initiative is also giving Muslim women an option to be separated from men while travelling.' 'This is not a mandatory policy as women are still allowed to travel in the other coaches,' he said, adding that reported sexual harassment cases on the train service was minimal.

More than 60 per cent of Malaysia's 28 million population are Muslim Malays, and the population includes large ethnic Chinese and Indian minorities.

Full report at:

http://www.straitstimes.com/BreakingNews/SEAsia/Story/STIStory_520145.html

-------

Roundup: Let Muslim women wear head scarves

Salma Ahmad

28 Apr 2010

I was perturbed to read letters in USA TODAY about Muslim women's head coverings that suggested the hijab is just a trivial piece of clothing ("Controversy over 'hijab' involves safety, not discrimination," Letters, April 20).

I fail to understand the logic behind harassing Muslim women to take off the hijab, which is a part of their identity. Women who wear head scarves are content and comfortable with who they are and what they choose to wear.

People who impose bans on the hijab— as has happened in Europe — escalate the situation by targeting the innocent members of a religion for actions and deeds committed by others. If a minority of extremists tarnish the name of Islam, then why punish the vast majority of innocent members of the same religion?

Full report at:

http://usatoday.printthis.clickability.com/pt/cpt?action=cpt&title=Roundup:+Let+Muslim+women+wear+head+scarves+-+USATODAY.com&expire=&urlID=425628753&fb=Y&url=http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/letters/2010-04-28-letters28_ST2_N.htm&partnerID=1660

------

Woman prof shot dead in Pak

28 Apr 2010

Quetta, April 27: Gunmen on Tuesday shot dead a woman university professor in southwest Pakistan, where targeted killings blamed on tribal insurgents, sectarian groups and militants are increasing, the police said.

Nazima Talib, 48, had just stepped into a rickshaw at the gate of Baluchistan University in Quetta city when gunmen riding a motorbike sprayed her with bullets, senior police officer Tariq Manzoor said. “She received multiple bullet wounds and died before she could be taken to hospital,” Mr Manzoor told AFP.

Talib came from Pakistan’s central province of Punjab that regional insurgents in Baluchistan accuse of siphoning off their resources and denying them independence, the police said. She was a senior teacher in the mass communications department.

Violence has recently surged in Baluchistan, which borders both Afg-hanistan and Iran. About two dozen people died in targeted killings in the province in March.

The oil and gas rich province is rife with Islamist militancy, sectarian violence and regional insurgency. Hundreds of people have died since Baluch rebels rose up in 2004 demanding political autonomy.    

http://www.asianage.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=10527:un-shuts-mission-in-kandahar-&catid=36:international&Itemid=61

------

Nawaz slams killing of woman educationist in Quetta

28 Apr 2010

 LAHORE: Pakistan Muslim League-N leader Nawaz Sharif has strongly denounced the killing of Professor Nazima Talib Mehdi in Quetta, saying the murder of an educationist is tantamount to playing with the future of entire nation.

In a statement issued from Lahore on Tuesday, Nawaz said teachers are the guarantors of nation’s future.

He said the growing incidents of target killings and open killings of teachers in Balochistan are a matter of concern for the entire nation.

The PML-N chief urged the provincial government to take effective measures to prevent such incidents and ensure that such untoward incidents don’t happen again.

http://www.thenews.jang.com.pk/4-27-2010/63945.htm

------

BLA claims responsibility for killing professor in Quetta

By Saleem Shahid

28 Apr, 2010

QUETTA: A woman professor of Balochistan University was gunned down here on Tuesday.

Nazima Talib was travelling in a rickshaw when two masked men on a motorcycle opened fire on her on the Sariab road.

Police said Ms Nazima received two bullets in her head and was taken to the Civil Hospital in critical condition, but she died before getting any medical treatment.

CCPO Shabbir Sheikh said it was probably a case of target killing.

The body of Ms Nazima was sent to Karachi for burial.

A spokesman for the Baloch Liberation Army claimed responsibility for Ms Nazima’s killing. He told reporters on phone that it was a reaction to the killing of two Baloch women in Quetta and Pasni and torturing of women political workers in Mand and Tump.

Full report at:

http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect/dawn-content-library/dawn/news/pakistan/metropolitan/03-university-professor-killed-in-act-of-target-killing-ss-03

------

Palestinian girls get ticket to Intel science fair

28 Apr, 2010

NABLUS, West Bank - Watching her blind aunt and uncle struggle to navigate the steep slopes and scant sidewalks of this hilly city, one Palestinian girl decided to reinvent the stick.

Armed with spare parts that are hard to find in the West Bank, Asil Abu Lil and two classmates patched together an obstacle-detecting cane that has won them a trip to San Jose, California, for Intel Corp.'s international youth science fair.

The three girls are the first Palestinians to participate in the prestigious event.

"Of course, I want to go to America, but this project is important for the blind and we want it to help them," Asil said.

Full report at:

http://arabnews.com/middleeast/article47806.ece

 

URL: http://www.newageislam.com/islam,-women-and-feminism/shabana-azmi--star-of-india/d/2772


Loading..

Loading..