New Age Islam
Sat Dec 05 2020, 06:14 AM

Islam, Women and Feminism ( 5 Oct 2015, NewAgeIslam.Com)

Muslim Woman Delivered Her Baby in a Ganapati Temple & Named Him 'Ganesh'


Noor delivered a healthy baby boy, and she and her husband are planning to name the boy Ganesh

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Indonesia: Two Women Arrested After Hugging In Public

New Transportation Scheme ‘To Benefit 1,800 Saudi Women in Riyadh’

Saudi Women Prefer To Build A Career than Get Married

'He Named Me Malala' Review: Film Dispels Muslim Stereotypes, Reveals Family Life of Girl Who Defied Taliban

Women’s Groups Dispute Rosmah, Malaysian PM’s Wife, Say Child Marriages Not Rare

Compiled by New Age Islam News Bureau

URL: http://www.newageislam.com/islam,-women-and-feminism/new-age-islam-news-bureau/muslim-woman-delivered-her-baby-in-a-ganapati-temple---named-him--ganesh-/d/104815

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Muslim Woman Delivered Her Baby in a Ganapati Temple & Named Him 'Ganesh'

By Nishi Jain,

06 Oct 2015

For every atrocity, there is an act of kindness that restores our faith in humanity. While on one hand, a Muslim man is cruelly lynched for eating beef in Dadri, on the other hand, Hindu devotees help a Muslim woman deliver her baby in a Ganpati temple in Mumbai.

Yes, this seems like a scene straight from a Bollywood film. Noor Jahan (24), and her husband Ilyaz Shaikh (27) had their worst fears played out when they were on the way to the hospital when Noor went into labour. The taxi driver, fearing a mess in his car, threw them out of the cab.

Standing right there on the street, the Muslim couple was helpless and distressed at a time when the Dadri incident is still all over news and fresh in public consciousness. Ilyaz told Mid-Day,

“We were so worried. My wife was close to delivering the baby and all we could see was a Ganpati Mandir. As soon as we got down outside the temple, some women, who were sitting in the verandah of the mandir, rushed to help us. We didn’t even have to ask.”

Yes, there is still some good left in the world. These women were Hindu devotees and had come to the temple to pray. Acting swiftly, they built a make-shift quarter with sarees and bedsheets for Noor Jahan to deliver the baby.

 “I was tense when I was close to delivering in the middle of the road. But when I saw that there was a temple, I realised that God himself is watching over us. What could be better than giving birth in front of Lord Ganpati," Noor Jahaan said.

Noor delivered a healthy baby boy, and she and her husband are planning to name the boy Ganesh. A Muslim boy called Ganesh, who was born in a Ganpati temple – his birth story will go down in history as an inspiring reminder of humanity triumphing over religion. That’s real India for you.

http://www.mensxp.com/special-features/today/27925-thrown-out-by-cab-driver-this-muslim-woman-delivered-her-baby-in-a-ganapati-temple-named-him-ganesh.html

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Indonesia: Two women arrested after hugging in public

05 October 2015

Two women have been arrested by Sharia police in Aceh, Indonesia on suspicion of being lesbians after hugging in public.

On 28 September the Wilayatul Hisbah, or Sharia police, arrested two women identified as AS, 18, and N, 19, after they saw them hugging in Banda Aceh, the provincial capital, according to Human Rights Watch.

A senior police official has said "we suspected that they were lesbians."

The Indonesian government allowed Aceh "Special Status" in 1999 and is the only Indonesian province of the 34 that can legally adopt by-laws derived from Sharia.

Although homosexuality is not illegal in the Indonesian national criminal code, Aceh's criminal code prohibits lesbianism and sodomy.

The Acehnese by-laws extend Sharia to non-Muslims and the criminal code allows punishments of 100 lashes and 100 months in prison for consensual same-sex acts.

The area is predominantly Muslim, but the by-laws also extend to the 90,000 non-Muslim residents, most of whom are Christian and Buddhist, as well as domestic and foreign visitors to the province.

The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), which Indonesia ratified in 2005, protects the rights to privacy and family, freedom of religion and prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex, religion and other status such as sexual orientation. It also prohibits punishments such as whipping that could amount to torture.

The Free Aceh Movement is bound by the ICCPR and has also agreed to adhere to the ICCPR in drafting the region's laws.

The head of the Wilayatul Hisbah told Indonesian media that he still believed that homosexuality is forbidden in Aceh, whether or not it is prohibited by local law.

A 2014 United Nations report said during the previous five years, "the situation for LGBT residents of Aceh and other marginalised communities has deteriorated."

Aceh's provincial legilsatlure should urgently repeal the discriminatory by-laws, Human Rights Watch said.

"Discriminatory laws and homophobic public rhetoric by officials create a climate of fear that stalks LGBT people in Aceh," Reid said. "There is no place in Indonesia for such laws and government behavior."

http://www.christiantoday.com/article/indonesia.two.women.arrested.after.hugging.in.public/66653.htm

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New transportation scheme ‘to benefit 1,800 Saudi women in Riyadh’

6 October 2015

The Ministry of Labor will soon start implementing the ‘safe transportation’ scheme for Saudi women working in the private sector.

In the first phase of the project, the ministry endorsed the list of 1,800 Saudi women who will benefit from the scheme in Riyadh city. Under the plan, the beneficiaries will have safe transportation to and fro between their homes and work places. The plan will come into force in all regions of the Kingdom in the varied phases.

The ministry is implementing the scheme in cooperation with the Human Resources Development Fund (HADAF) and Takamul Holding Company.

A source at the ministry told Okaz/Saudi Gazette that the scheme ensures safe transportation for Saudi women staff working in the private sector. This is part of the initiatives to encourage a large number of Saudi educated women to take up jobs in private firms, especially in retail commercial firms and industrial sector. According to the plan, the employer shall meet the cost of transportation of the female staff.

The initiative was launched in the wake of a study, carried out last year, and that highlighted the negative effects of lack of transport on productivity and attendance of female staff in the private sector.

Around 46 percent of women face daily issues with transport, compared to 27 percent of their male counterparts. The lack of transportation companies and the high costs of using private taxis or hiring a driver have taken its toll on women employees. A report published by the Council of Saudi Chambers also highlighted women’s problems in commuting to work due to the absence of public transport.

This article first appeared in the Saudi Gazette on Oct. 6, 2015.

https://english.alarabiya.net/en/News/middle-east/2015/10/06/New-transportation-scheme-to-benefit-1-800-Saudi-women-in-Riyadh-.html

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New Transportation Scheme ‘To Benefit 1,800 Saudi Women in Riyadh’

October 05, 2015

JEDDAH — The Ministry of Labor will soon start implementing the ‘safe transportation’ scheme for Saudi women working in the private sector.

In the first phase of the project, the ministry endorsed the list of 1,800 Saudi women who will benefit from the scheme in Riyadh city. Under the plan, the beneficiaries will have safe transportation to and fro between their homes and work places. The plan will come into force in all regions of the Kingdom in the varied phases.

The ministry is implementing the scheme in cooperation with the Human Resources Development Fund (HADAF) and Takamul Holding Company.

A source at the ministry told Okaz/Saudi Gazette that the scheme ensures safe transportation for Saudi women staff working in the private sector. This is part of the initiatives to encourage a large number of Saudi educated women to take up jobs in private firms, especially in retail commercial firms and industrial sector.  According to the plan, the employer shall meet the cost of transportation of the female staff.

The initiative was launched in the wake of a study, carried out last year, and that highlighted the negative effects of lack of transport on productivity and attendance of female staff in the private sector.

Around 46 percent of women face daily issues with transport, compared to 27 percent of their male counterparts. The lack of transportation companies and the high costs of using private taxis or hiring a driver have taken its toll on women employees. A report published by the Council of Saudi Chambers also highlighted women’s problems in commuting to work due to the absence of public transport.

http://www.saudigazette.com.sa/index.cfm?method=home.regcon&contentid=20151006258860

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Saudi Women Prefer To Build A Career than Get Married

6 October 2015

JEDDAH — Not so long ago, it was unusual for one to hear that a woman in her 20s or early 30s was unmarried. However, since women have been given more opportunities to work and realize their dreams, things have changed. Many working women put off their marriage to build a career.

Lina Muhammad, a Saudi, said she will not sacrifice her career to get married. “I thank God that I did not marry at a young age. If I had done so I would never have been as successful as I am now. I’m doing PhD now,” she said.

“I hold a managerial position in my company and I have also undertaken three language courses. I have visited 15 countries and I am planning to develop my own project. If I was married, I wouldn’t have had the time to do half of what I have done,” she said.

Lina is of the view that there are many things that women can do apart from getting married. “I have several conditions to get married. Yes, I am 31, but no one can force me to get married. I will not marry unless I find a man who understands the nature of my job and understands that I need to travel on work related matters and spend nights away from home,” she said.

“He also needs to understand that my job and career come first. If he cannot understand all of this, he will destroy all that I have painstakingly achieved so far,” she added.

Sara Ali, another Saudi, believes that her work is the only way to provide her with safety in life and not marriage as many people believe. “I have been working since I was in the university and I am really proud of what I’ve achieved. I believe that if a woman wants to be safe, then she must have a job, be highly educated and has her own money. Men and marriage never provide safety,” she said.

“I’m 29 and I don’t care about what people think about me — my job and career come first. I want a man who understands that. I’m not a servant or a maid, I am a woman. My duty in life is not to cook, feed and raise children or take orders from a man. I’m a woman who struggled to achieve what I have achieved today. I want a man who will support me in my professional life,” said Sara.

Parents usually want their daughters to get married so they can feel that she is safe and if they were to die then she will not be alone without protection. “As other parents, my parents believe that a man will provide me with a safe life, but I believe that my job serves that purpose until I find the right man,” she said.

Another Saudi female, who did not wish to reveal her identity, said she struggled a lot to get to where she is today. Even her family did not support her in building a career and felt there was no reason for her to work. “They tried many times to make me resign from my job and get married, but I never listened to them,” she said.

Her parents even said they would give her a monthly stipend equal to her salary if she stopped working, but she rejected that idea. “I started working many years ago when the idea was something totally rejected by my parents. Even today, we fight every day because of my job. They believe that working is a waste of time, but I believe that I have talent and that I must work,” she said.

“I became a manager in a short period of time. I worked hard and I have my own money. I might be 30 but I’m so happy with my life,” she said. “I love my job, I love my lifestyle. I don’t have a routine, I never get bored because I do is what makes me happy and enjoy life. I haven’t got married because I can’t find a man who understands my lifestyle and respect it,” she said.

http://www.saudigazette.com.sa/index.cfm?method=home.regcon&contentid=20151006258821

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'He Named Me Malala' Review: Film Dispels Muslim Stereotypes, Reveals Family Life of Girl Who Defied Taliban

October 5, 2015

Islamic extremists such as the Taliban advance their agendas by inflicting pain and fear upon those who oppose their radical ideologies — especially Christians. But even fellow Muslims are not safe.

The new documentary "He Named Me Malala" takes an eye opening look at how rogue factions like the Taliban inflict constant terror in people's daily lives, and how the actions of one girl, who became the youngest-ever Nobel Prize winner, has inspired people around the world to stop being silenced by fear.

"Malala" is based on the book of the same name and tells the true story of Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani Muslim girl who was shot in head by the Taliban during an assassination attempt on her way home from school in 2012 but survived.

Director Davis Guggenheim uses her relationship with her father, Ziauddin, as the foundation for their family's story that has inspired many to fight for women's right to education around the world.

Along with her father, Malala charmingly narrates most of the film. In it she dons the hijab and traditional Muslim attire, and as the film progresses, viewers grow a deep admiration for her bravery and ability to eloquently articulate her values and beliefs.

"Malala" is a jaw-dropping depiction of life for Muslims in territories plagued by radical groups, and one family's stand for girls' right to education as the Taliban viciously attempts to silence them. Malala's fearlessness to speak out, even after being shot and partially paralyzed, is moving. The documentary also exposes the many evils perpetrated against Christians by Islamic extremists.

The film begins as Malala is recovering in the U.K. from gunshot wounds to her head, neck and shoulder that led to swelling in her brain. It then jumps back to tell the story of her upbringing with a father who had his own school in their small town of Swat Valley.

From the time that Malala was born her father believed that she would be a vessel to articulate the value of education to the world, and he instilled that value in Malala at a young age.

The film shows how Malala's long journey, both before and after the shooting, led her to speaking engagements at the U.N. and to meetings with prominent world leaders. Guggenheim also goes to great lengths to demonstrate that, despite Malala's calling to be a voice for the voiceless, she is just a regular girl who does homework and argues with her younger brothers when at home with family.

The relationship that Malala has with her father is the real soul of this documentary. Together, the two also try to dispel some stereotypes believed about Muslim households in the Middle East, such as the belief that families bar women from attaining an education.

"Malala" also uses animation to help illustrate certain parts of the young woman's life, including the time she spent at her father's school in Swat. The illustrations work well with the rest of the footage and add a certain poingnance to Malala's story.

The film climaxes as Malala wins the Nobel Peace Prize for her humanitarian work for women's rights in 2014.

"He Named Me Malala" is more than a documentary film. It's a political and religious statement that could help advance women's rights in Islamic countries. Malala Yousafzai is an example of a woman who doesn't need to be secularized in order to be smart and sophisticated, and she is never shown questioning or blaming her faith for the atrocities committed by the Taliban.

The film feels like a day in the life of this unique individual, and at the end, you can't help but want to support her mission.

http://www.christianpost.com/news/he-named-me-malala-review-film-dispels-muslim-stereotypes-reveals-family-life-of-girl-who-defied-taliban-146583/

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Women’s Groups Dispute Rosmah, Malaysian PM’s Wife, Say Child Marriages Not Rare

2 October 2015

A coalition of women's rights groups today hit out at the prime minister's wife, Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor for saying that child marriages are rare in Malaysia, and insisted it was not the case.

The Joint Action Group for Gender Equality (JAG) said Malaysia still had a long way to go in overcoming child marriage, and tackling the problem would require an accurate and responsible depiction of the trend.

"Child marriages are definitely not rare in Malaysia as mentioned by Datin Seri Rosmah," said JAG in a statement today.

"JAG deplores downplaying the gravity of occurrences of child marriages in Malaysia."

JAG said that in 2010, Deputy Women, Family and Community Development Minister Heng Seai Kie said approximately 16,000 girls aged below 15 were married.

Meanwhile, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) 2014 report recorded that more than 15,000 Malaysian children were married off before the age of 19, said JAG.

It added that the statistics, while "worryingly high", were only cases of child marriages that were reported.

"With the adoption of the resolution to end child marriage by the Human Rights Council earlier this year, Malaysia should do more to acknowledge the problem of child marriages and take better measures to end it.

"Therefore, we call for more responsible and accurate depiction of the occurrences of child marriages in Malaysia especially when presented by public figures, as child marriage is a human rights violation."

Bernama reported that Rosmah had told a breakfast meeting in New York that child marriages were rare in Malaysia due to a good education system and low poverty rate.

The meeting was attended by the Netherlands's Princess Mabel Van Oranjestad and spouses of leaders from Panama and Zambia, the report said.

Rosmah is accompanying Datuk Seri Najib Razak on his working visit to the United States to attend the United Nations General Assembly. – October 2, 2015.

http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/womens-groups-dispute-rosmah-say-child-marriages-not-rare

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URL: http://www.newageislam.com/islam,-women-and-feminism/new-age-islam-news-bureau/muslim-woman-delivered-her-baby-in-a-ganapati-temple---named-him--ganesh-/d/104815


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