New Age Islam
Fri Dec 04 2020, 12:42 PM

Islam, Women and Feminism ( 23 Feb 2018, NewAgeIslam.Com)

More Women in Iran Put Their Right Foot Forward As Headscarf Protests Persist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Several dozen Iranian women have published photos of themselves in the street or parks, their heads uncovered, waving their scarves in an act of defiance. (File photo: AFP)

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Muslim Women Are Demanding For More Female-Friendly Mosques

Belgian Court Allows Muslim School Girls to Wear Veil

Saudi Arabia Now Opens Doors of Military Jobs to Women

Hundreds of Blushing Brides Flock To Jeddah Bridal Show

Video of Woman Shoved By Policeman in Iran Sparks Criticism on Social Media

Adwa Al-Arifi Makes History as First Female Committee Member at Saudi Arabia Football Federation

Focussing on Pressing and Urgent Women’s Issues — Macsa

Compiled by New Age Islam News Bureau

URL: http://www.newageislam.com/islam,-women-and-feminism/new-age-islam-news-bureau/more-women-in-iran-put-their-right-foot-forward-as-headscarf-protests-persist/d/114402

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More women in Iran put their right foot forward as headscarf protests persist

23 February 2018

A video showing an Iranian policeman shoving a woman protesting against mandatory headscarves off her makeshift podium in a busy Tehran street sparked criticism on social media on Friday.

The video of the solitary female demonstrator was apparently shot on Enghelab (Revolution) Street, where a woman was first detained in December after standing with her head uncovered waving a scarf on a stick.

Since then several dozen Iranian women have published photos of themselves in the street or parks, their heads uncovered, waving their scarves in an act of defiance.

‘What’s my offence?’

The woman in the video is seen standing on a street cabinet with her arms raised in the air, her long blond hair worn in a high pony tail.

Asked by two policemen to get down, she replies calmly: “Tell me what my offence is and I’ll get down.”

“Disturbing public order,” one of them says. A crowd then forms and starts clapping.

In the second part of the video, apparently shot on a cellphone, one of the policemen steps up to the same height as the woman and shoves her off her podium, to the indignation of onlookers. “Where are the human rights?” a male voice asks.

Lawyer and human rights activist Nasrin Sotoudeh wrote on Facebook that the policeman broke the law because “no man has the right to treat a woman like this”. Twitter users also reacted with dismay.

“Breaking the law while in law enforcement uniform is our problem in Iran,” one tweeted. “The same police force that makes the girl fall over in Enghelab Street is the one responsible for ensuring the security and viability of the elections,” said another.

Since December around 30 women have been arrested in Tehran for defying a requirement under Iran’s Islamic legal code to wear a headscarf.

In recent days, Iran’s morality police have stepped up their campaign against women since the symbolic protest against the hijab began weeks ago. The number of participants continue to increase dramatically.

Standing up

Earlier this month a video of a young woman taking off her hijab in Iran in front of a Basij base (Islamic Revolutionary Guard’s Morality Police) emerged. This event comes nearly two weeks after the first Iranian woman who took off her hijab in protest of the forced dress code .

The woman, 31-year-old Wida Mowahed, a mother of a 19-month-old daughter, stood in the middle of Tehran’s “Inqlab” (revolution) street raising her scarf on a stick and waving it like a flag.

A video of the protest was widely shared three days before the outbreak of the popular protests in Tehran on December 27. Mowahed was shortly arrested after her protest, but was reportedly released following an outcry from human rights activists.

Her courage prompted other women, old and young, to fight for their right. Another recent video showed an elderly woman, barely capable of walking, also protesting against the forced dress code in hopes of change.

https://english.alarabiya.net/en/features/2018/02/23/More-women-in-Iran-put-their-right-foot-forward-as-headscarf-protests-persist.html

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Muslim women are demanding for more female-friendly mosques

23.02.2018

The Muslim women in Britain are demanding for more female-friendly mosques.

According to The Guardian, Britain mosques are open to the general public but not the practicing Muslim women.

Women have launched ‘The Open My Mosque’ campaign in an attempt to change this.

What do British Muslim women want

The campaign is a social media project established by 36-year-old activist Anita Nayyar in 2015.

She started the initiative because the data shows that 28% of the 1,975 mosques in Britain do not allow women enter the premises.

When access is granted, women do not get a prayer space, instead, a teaching space, such as a girls’ madrasa is the only option.

The result is a lot of “frustrated”, “isolated” and “humiliated” women all over the country, as documented by Nayyar.

She says, “Women who feel excluded from the mosque face more exclusion than their non-Muslim counterparts. If they cannot participate in religious life, then they can’t get involved in community life, and that increases the already existing lack of inclusion of Muslim women in public life.”

Nayar adds, “My right as a religious minority is protected in the workplace, but how is my right as a woman protected when mosques are turning me away? We need bodies like the Charity Commission and the Equality and Human Rights Commission to challenge how these mosques govern their spaces. As British Muslims, the only way for us to move forward is by a commitment to equal rights.”

Nayar is not the only one doing something about this terrible situation as the plan for UK’s first women-run mosque was established in 2015.

Women also access to the Masjid Khadijah (Khadijah mosque) in Peterborough, which has women on the committee board.

Imam Qari Asim of Leeds Makkah Mosque has weighed in on the issue saying, “Women shouldn’t only participate in prayer, but we also need to create spaces where they are driving the activities and life of the mosque.

“It’s not even a theological issue, what we need is a cultural shift. When mosques offer space for women, they should see it as a right, not a favor.”

This makes the Open My Mosque social media campaign very necessary for British Muslim women.

Hopefully, their objectiveto have mosques open for women during all hours will be accomplished.

http://www.pulse.ng/communities/religion/british-muslim-women-want-more-female-friendly-mosques-id8027658.html

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Belgian court allows Muslim school girls to wear veil

February 24, 2018

A court in the Belgian town of Tongeren ruled Friday that 14 Muslim girls who attend two state schools must be allowed to wear the veil at school, despite a general ban on veils and headscarves in Flemish state schools in northern Belgium.

According to Belgian media reports, the girls' parents took legal action as they didn't agree with ban at the two schools their daughters attend.

The Tongeren judge responsible for communication with the press, Ariane Braccio, told the Belgian VRT News network that "in reaching its decision the court took into account provisions made in the European Treaty on Human Right that obliges all EU countries, including Belgium, to allow its citizens to practice their religion in complete freedom.

"Exceptions are allowed if there are issues with segregation or pressure being applied to convert. However, this was not the case here," she said.

Five of the 14 girls are now at other schools. The others can now wear their veils in class, unless the schools appeal against the ruling , said the reports. (end) nk.bs

https://www.kuna.net.kw/ArticleDetails.aspx?id=2697069&language=en

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Saudi Arabia now opens doors of military jobs to women

February 23, 2018

In the wake of Saudi Arabia’s ‘Vision 2030’ which is opening up new work opportunities for women, the Arab kingdom has announced soldier rank positions for them in the royal military.

Opportunities in the field will be available to women in several of the kingdom’s governorates including Riyadh, Makkah, al-Qusaim, and al Madina, said a statement issued by Saudi’s General Security division according to the Arab media.

The latest development is a part of an initiative launched by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, aiming to diversify the economy beyond oil and mandates increasing the percentage of Saudi women in the workforce.

However, to be eligible for a soldier rank role, a woman must meet 12 conditions. She has to be of Saudi origin, and needs to have been brought up in the kingdom except if her father had to live abroad due to a ‘government-related responsibility’.

An ideal candidate must be between 25 to 35 years of age and holds at least a high school education, Al Arabiya reported, adding that those married to non-Saudi men are not allowed to apply.

The candidates must have a clear criminal record and proof that they have not previously been employed in any government or military-related institution.

According to the job advertisement, applicants who pass initial interviews will have to undergo a medical checkup.

Saudi women to start own businesses without male permission

While women still face a host of restrictions in the ultraconservative Muslim kingdom, Saudi Arabia’s public prosecutor’s office this month said it would begin recruiting women investigators for the first time.

The kingdom has also opened 140 positions for women at airports and border crossings, a historic first that the government said drew 107,000 female applicants.

Women in Saudi Arabia can now open their own businesses without the consent of a husband or male relative, as the kingdom pushes to expand a fast-growing private sector. The policy change also marks a major step away from the strict guardianship system that has ruled the country for decades.

The crown prince, the powerful heir to the Saudi throne, has been leading the drive to expand the role of women in the workforce in recent months.

His father, King Salman, in September approved the end of a decades-long ban on driving, which goes into effect in June.

The 32-year-old prince pledged a “moderate, open” Saudi Arabia in October, breaking with ultra-conservative clerics in favour of an image catering to foreign investors and Saudi youth.

Prince Mohammed is widely seen as the chief architect behind Saudi Arabia’s “Vision 2030” reform programme, which seeks to elevate the percentage of women in the work force from 22% to nearly one-third.

https://tribune.com.pk/story/1643108/3-saudi-arabia-now-opens-doors-military-jobs-women/

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Hundreds of blushing brides flock to Jeddah bridal show

February 24, 2018

JEDDAH — Hundreds of brides-to-be flocked over the past two days to the first ever bridal exhibition and fashion show to be organized in Jeddah.

Princess Mudi Bint Nasir Bin Abdulaziz inaugurated the 19th Saudi International Weddings Exhibition at Jeddah Hilton Thursday evening.

"Saudi women are becoming an essential partner in the development process particularly following many decisions that met women’s aspirations to enhance their skills and empower them to be productive, achieve their dreams and express themselves," the princess said.

For the first time ever, the exhibition hosted a fashion show with the participation of at least seven well-known designers. The show also gave a chance to upcoming designers in a segment called “Future fashion designers”.

Princess Mudi highlighted the role of Saudi women fashion designers who managed to present their distinguished works particularly by displaying traditional Saudi designs representing different regions of the Kingdom.

She called for supporting productive families and providing venues for them to showcase their products at all major exhibitions.

About 2,000 people attended Thursday's inauguration ceremony where a large number of local and international investors were present.

It is estimated that Saudis spend over SR2 billion on wedding clothes annually.

http://saudigazette.com.sa/article/529061/SAUDI-ARABIA/Hundreds-of-blushing-brides-flock-to-Jeddah-bridal-show

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Video of woman shoved by policeman in Iran sparks criticism on social media

February 23, 2018

A video showing an Iranian policeman shoving a woman protesting against mandatory headscarves off her makeshift podium in a busy Tehran street sparked criticism on social media on Friday.

The video of the solitary female demonstrator was apparently shot on Enghelab (Revolution) Street, where a woman was first detained in December after standing with her head uncovered waving a scarf on a stick.

Since then several dozen Iranian women have published photos of themselves in the street or parks, their heads uncovered, waving their scarves in an act of defiance.

The woman in the video is seen standing on a street cabinet with her arms raised in the air, her long blond hair worn in a high ponytail.

Asked by two policemen to get down, she replies calmly: “Tell me what my offence is and I'll get down.”“Disturbing public order,” one of them says.

A crowd then forms and starts clapping.In the second part of the video, apparently shot on a cellphone, one of the policemen steps up to the same height as the woman and shoves her off her podium, to the indignation of onlookers.

“Where are the human rights?” a male voice asks.

Lawyer and human rights activist Nasrin Sotoudeh wrote on Facebook that the policeman broke the law because “no man has the right to treat a woman like this”.

Twitter users also reacted with dismay.“Breaking the law while in law enforcement uniform is our problem in Iran ,” one tweeted.

“The same police force that makes the girl fall over in Enghelab Street is the one responsible for ensuring the security and viability of the elections,” said another.

Since December around 30 women have been arrested in Tehran for defying a requirement under Iran 's legal code to wear a headscarf.

https://nation.com.pk/23-Feb-2018/video-of-woman-shoved-by-policeman-in-iran-sparks-criticism-on-social-media

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Adwa Al-Arifi makes history as first female committee member at Saudi Arabia Football Federation

23 February 2018

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia’s Football Federation has appointed the first woman committee member in its history.

As part of radical changes to the federation announced on Friday, Adwa Al-Arifi was named on a newly appointed seven-member corporate social responsibility committee. She will draw on her experience working as part of the Saudi Federation of Mass Participation and in creating the first women’s football team in Riyadh to improve fan engagement, drive community initiatives and campaigns.

A graduate of Al-Yamamah University with an honors degree in business administration, Al-Arifi is considered a female grassroots specialist and her appointment looks likely to encourage further advances for women in the Kingdom.

As part of a wide-ranging overhaul of its set-up, a four-man committee to oversee the national team affairs was put in place and will be headed by former Saudi Arabia international Nawaf Al-Temyat.

The federation also approved the formation of a five-man ethics and discipline committee, which will be led by former AFC legal executive James Kitching. The federation also accepted the resignation of its secretary general, Abdul-Elah Momenah, appointing Louai Al-Subaei as his replacement.

http://www.arabnews.com/node/1252936/sports

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Focussing on pressing and urgent women’s issues — Macsa

February 23, 2018

FEBRUARY 23 — On February 19, Malaysia's progress in women's rights was reviewed at the 69th session of the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (Cedaw). This is the second time Malaysia has been reviewed after it acceded to Cedaw in 1995.

The review process is undoubtedly one of the best platforms to raise awareness of issues concerning the rights of women in Malaysia.

The Malaysian Alliance of Civil Society Organisations in the UPR Process (Macsa) welcomes the government’s commitment in combating discrimination against women including the government’s assurance to enact Gender Equality Act, as well as its commitment in upholding and implementing a legal framework and policies pertaining to marriage and family on the basis of equality between men and women in both our civil and Shariah legal systems.

Macsa, however, would like to put on record our reservation about the use of the term “gender” as opposed to “sex” in the proposed Act, as the former, a socially constructed concept, lack the definitive scientific proof and arbitrary in its definition; leaving it open to manipulation for political reasons.

In order for legislation to be effective in combating discrimination, the terms used must be specific and scientific, so as not to allow debatable interpretations to interfere with implementation.

Macsa also applauds the commitment and participation of other civil society organisations and has derived much good from the reports that were prepared by the Human Rights Commission of Malaysia (Suhakam) as well as the Coalition of NGOs’ shadow reports.

However, Macsa wishes to express its regrets that some pressing and urgent issues were conspicuously left out from these reports; as well as on the absence of engagement with Muslim CSOs on the issues specifically pertaining to the interest of the Muslim communities.

Taciturnity on hijab ban

Macsa notes that the hijab ban among Muslim employees working in the hotel industry and tourism sectors was not mentioned in any of the reports. This ban is a systematic form of religious discrimination which has denied many Muslim women their rights to wear hijab at the workplace.

Macsa has received complaints that many graduates who applied for internships in hotels and tourism industries were denied placement on the basis of their insistence to honour the wearing of hijab.

This is truly an appalling form of discrimination involving more than 20 hotels, where qualified Muslim women are denied jobs solely on the basis of their religious belief.

Simplistic approach on the unilateral conversion issue

Further, Macsa is also alarmed at the stance taken by Suhakam in supporting the Malaysian judiciary’s recent incongruous decision in the Indira Gandhi case; and on Suhakam’s suggestion that the government reintroduce the previously proposed (but withdrawn) section 88A to the Law Reform (Marriage and Divorce) Act 1976, to ban unilateral conversion of children by one parent.

While such an approach, on the surface of it, may seem to ensure equality between both parents in determining the religious upbringing of the children, closer inspection into the intricate issue however reveals that it is far too simplistic and would only act to discriminate against one of the parent who converts to Islam.

This is because, to require a father or mother to obtain the consent of the other in cases where the parents are already in the midst of a divorce proceeding — and therefore are no longer on good terms — would almost certainly be impossible.

Such a requirement would therefore amount to stripping away the fundamental right of the father or the mother to determine the upbringing of the child.

The parent who converts to Islam would not have any opportunity at all of being heard, for the mandatory requirement of consent, which is rendered impossible in the light of the relationship turning sour, would obstruct the court from even entertaining any such application should the mandatory requirement not being fulfilled.

This is in direct contradiction to an earlier decision by the Malaysian Federal Court in the year 2008, in the case of Subashini Rajasingam vs Saravanan Thangothoray and Other Appeals wherein the court took a more harmonious approach, to allow a parent who converts to Islam to unilaterally convert the children as well, but at the same time accords the non-converting parent the right to objection.

And where such objection is raised, the matter would be resolved by the court on a case to case basis, taking into account all the surrounding facts, the opposing wishes of the parents as well as the paramount interest of the child.

Wrong emphasis on a non-issue

Macsa is also concerned that United Nations Cedaw committee members were misled into believing that Malaysia allegedly practises female genital mutilation (FGM), when in fact, what is currently being practised is a form of female circumcision which has been proven by health data monitoring and clinical studies to have no negative medical complications.

Macsa condemns all portrayals given at the review session of any impropriety of the practice in Malaysia especially the remarks that call to undermine the fatwa passed by the Fatwa Committee of the Malaysian National Council of Islamic Religious Affairs in 2009.

It must be stressed that there is a huge difference between FGM on the one hand, and female circumcision on the other under the Shafie school of Islamic jurisprudence.

The fatwa only concerns the latter, and not the former, and raising concerns over FGM to undermine the fatwa is disingenuous and unfair.

So much attention has been given to the issue of female circumcision in terms of its medical harms and benefits, that we strongly feel more pressing issues are being marginalised; such as the increasing prevalence of homosexuality and bisexuality in our country, which has contributed significantly to the spread of HIV infections.

http://www.themalaymailonline.com/what-you-think/article/focussing-on-pressing-and-urgent-womens-issues-macsa#Aov6ifkIK64y81u1.97

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URL: http://www.newageislam.com/islam,-women-and-feminism/new-age-islam-news-bureau/more-women-in-iran-put-their-right-foot-forward-as-headscarf-protests-persist/d/114402

 

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