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Ijtihad, Rethinking Islam (08 Mar 2014 NewAgeIslam.Com)



Islam Needs its John Locke

 

 

By Mustafa Akyol

March/08/2014

Since the beginning of this new century, it has become popular in the West, and sometimes even in the East, to argue that Islam needs its “Martin Luther.” Accordingly, the authoritarianism, intolerance and violence perpetrated in the name of Islam could only be overcome with a “reform” similar to the one that began in Christendom some five centuries ago.

However, more careful observers quickly noted two little problems with this idea. First, unlike in Catholicism, to which Luther reacted, there is no central authority in Islam. Thus, the main result of the Protestant Reformation, which is decentralized religion, is already the case in Islam. Secondly, whatever its merits and contributions are, the Protestant Reformation did not initiate an era of liberty, tolerance and non-violence in Europe. Quite the contrary, it initiated at least two centuries of intra-religious wars and purges that caused quite a lot of bloodshed.

That is why other observers argued that it is simply a loss of time to deal with “reform” within Islam. The only way to liberal democracy, they said, is to push Islam out of the public with an authoritarian, top-down secularism. Inspired by the radical secularists of the French Revolution, and exemplified by Kemalism in Turkey, this idea had two major flaws as well: First, its very authoritarianism was a blow on the liberty it allegedly championed. Second, the hope for marginalizing religion was doomed to failure, as exemplified, again, by Turkey.

However, there was also a less travelled, even less noticed, road as well: An Enlightenment of the Anglo-Saxon type, which does not attack religion, as done by its French counterpart, but reinterprets it within a new political framework that values liberty, tolerance and diversity.

Not the road of Luther or Voltaire, if you will, but the road of John Locke.

The British philosopher has long been in my heart and mind with regards to his approach to religion, but a fine book that I recently had a chance read made things even clearer: “Islam, Secularism and Liberal Democracy” by scholar Nader Hashemi (Oxford University Press, 2009).

Hashemi, in his impeccable book, deals with many issues relating to religion and politics, but his take on Locke and how a Lockean approach can help political thought in Islam is especially notable. He first reminds that “Locke’s England in the 17th century ... [was] under the sway of an authoritarian and illiberal religious doctrine ... [as] much of the Muslim world today.” In return, Locke’s solution was not “rooted in rejection of Christianity, but rather a reinterpretation of it.”

Locke offered this reinterpretation by arguing for the compatibility of reason and revelation (not their conflict), and pluralism among differing interpretations of the faith. He also argued that the Bible does not propose a system of government (such as “the divine rights of kings”).

He emphasized that the religious faith of the individual is meaningful only when based on “the inward persuasion of the Mind,” which cannot be compelled by “outside force.”

All of these were religious arguments. “Judging by today’s standards, many would consider Locke and his compatriots Christian fundamentalists,” Hashemi even claims. I think he is right. I also think that liberalism within Islam will only emerge thanks to “fundamentalists” like Locke.

Source: http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/islam-needs-its-john-locke.aspx?pageID=449&nID=63332&NewsCatID=411

URL: http://www.newageislam.com/ijtihad,-rethinking-islam/mustafa-akyol/islam-needs-its-john-locke/d/56047

 




TOTAL COMMENTS:-   5


  • @ R M Yunus.

    Most of the things you said is already said in Quran, and yes there is NO God in Islam, the “religious god”—laailaaha. But the there is one entity that has created the Universe with the all the universal authority to sustain it etc—illallaah, the intangible one. The Muslims have solidified it and monopolized it and registered its name as the Arab Allah in Muslim Vatican and have locked it in the dark hole in Makka.

    The religious gods—the ones like maulanaa, muftis, ulamaa, popes, pundits monks, rabbis etc etc dead and alive are all men/women made and have written books in its name.

    Quran too says that religion IS a “business”. It is a huge industry, bigger than the war industry and all other industries put together.

    In the case of Muslims too are communitieS of men/women, just like all other religious communities.


    By Rashid - 3/10/2014 2:01:17 AM



  • dear Rashid - 3/9/2014 11:00:46 PM
    some are trying to reform the Islam, others Muslims. there is a confusion. what requires reform? for you and mr observer it is Muslim community to be reformed, for some like GM it is Islam.
    Do you think Islam is a perfect system to guide the Muslims? i have found that there is no God in Islam. Islam's gods are all kinds of Ulema. Some are takfeeris, some are, Bidatis, some are muqallids some are ghair muqwallid. some are liberal, some are orthodox.
    Religions are shops/malls and Ulemas are shopkeepers. their followers are brand ambassadors and market manipulators. commodities are prophets, iman, deen, sharia, haya etc Public is buyer.
    la ilaha il al Ulema

    By rational mohammed yunus - 3/9/2014 11:31:48 PM



  • “..intolerance and violence perpetrated in the name of Islam could only be overcome with a “reform…”

    Yes it is in the name of Islam—carried out by ‘people’ who call themselves Muslims. The reform required is in the general society called the Muslim world, as correctly put by Hashemi as “Muslim world” and not Islamic world as is the general scholarly practice--“….[as] much of the Muslim world today.” He said

    There were and there are many ‘reformers’ in the Muslim world, but they are only read and acted upon by the converted and not acted upon by the ignorant majority. Actions are all guided by the churches and clergy and they hold sway from the pulpit upon the majority.

    The reform required is in the PEOPLE and not Islam; correct from the year dot; say from Adam, if he was a prophet?


    By Rashid - 3/9/2014 11:00:46 PM



  • The title is quite interesting but the article should have been, I think, a little more comprehensive. We also need someone like Malcolm X, I have been planning to write about Malcolm X but due to lack of time  (as I am extremely busy in my exams) I cannot. 
    By Aiman Reyaz - 3/8/2014 9:44:25 PM



  • > "An Enlightenment of the Anglo-Saxon type, which does not attack religion, as done by its French counterpart, but reinterprets it within a new political framework that values liberty, tolerance and diversity.".....


    Reinterpreting Islam within such new framework is exactly the task of 21st Century leaders and scholars.


    > "Locke offered this reinterpretation by arguing for the compatibility of reason and revelation (not their conflict), and pluralism among differing interpretations of the faith. He also argued that the Bible does not propose a system of government (such as “the divine rights of kings”)." .....


    Locke may as well have been writing about Islam!



    By Ghulam Mohiyuddin - 3/8/2014 2:01:11 PM



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