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Islamic Society (20 Apr 2017 NewAgeIslam.Com)


Listen To Sonu Nigam, Please

 

By C. M. Naim for New Age Islam

20 April 2017

My heart beats to the same rhythm as Sonu Nigam’s. His cri de cœur is also mine. Yes, please, do take seriously this matter of calling the faithful to prayers through loudspeakers, particularly in the early morning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sonu Nigam is seen sporting a shaved head after the press conference. (Image courtesy: Hindustan Times via ANI)

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When I was growing up in the small town of Barabanki in the 1940s, the mosques had no loudspeakers. Those abominations would appear at the political rallies, and then disappear. Even in our Eidgah, where hundreds of people came from all parts of the town to pray together on the two Eid festivals, no loudspeakers were used to summon them. Not only that, even during the prayers, no microphone was used by the imam. In fact, when the idea was suggested by some individuals it was quickly rejected by most of the ‘notables, ‘who organized the special prayers, as well as the ‘clergy. ‘The imams of the neighborhood mosques, at the time, would proclaim the azaan themselves, or had some young man with a loud voice do the honors from the roof of the mosque. The human sound, often quite melodic, that emerged from his throat had enough reach to bring the nearby faithful to the mosque; and it did so no less efficiently than the electronically engorged aberration that now resounds over Barabanki. Actually, I should use the plural, for what we now have are scores of aberrations. Last year, when I made a determined effort over several days, I discovered that the fajr or dawn prayer azaan came barging into my room in Barabanki from eight different mosques—mind you, only one of them was within walking distance from my home—and the whole thing, the calls from those eight different mosques, lasted nearly 30 minutes, as each mosque made its separate contribution. At moments, what one heard was an ugly cacophony. Far from providing the aesthetic pleasure that a single human voice produced for most listeners in my boyhood days, the effect of what came over the air now was intolerable even to my deeply devout sisters.

Undistorted and un-amplified, an ordinary human’s voice was perfectly able to do the task in the days when few people had alarm clocks or, for that matter, even a wristwatch. But now, even the tiny mosque in my neighborhood that can accommodate no more than 50 or 60 people has two loudspeakers tied to its minaret, and a sound system that sends its call out to a body of people 50 times larger than its capacity. But one cannot suggest a change. Apparently, the people who attend the neighborhood mosque can do perfectly well without an amplified alarm in all aspects of their daily lives except when it comes to reaching the mosque to form a congregation. Their grandfathers could do without loudspeakers but not these stalwarts of the 21st century.

At this point, I must do the expected thing. And I do so heartily. I totally believe that no use of inappropriate amplification should be allowed in open spaces. Period. Not at akhandpaths, not at jagrans, not at wedding celebrations, not at political meetings, not at anything. Not within a mile of any hospital. Not close to any school. And most definitely not during the hours of 10 PM and 7 AM. Needless to say, the required laws are there on the books, what does not exist is the will to enforce them.

There are, however, a couple of things that Indian Muslims should themselves be concerned about that are related to the matter of electronically amplified sounds emerging from mosques. The idea of praying together in a congregation is quite important in Islam, hence the need to construct mosques. And that leads to the immediately relevant question: how far away should one mosque be from another? The rule is clear: mosques should be so built that the call from one must not reach another. The worshippers should not be confused, nor should there be an appearance of discord or disunity. If you don’t believe me, ask the All India Muslim Personal Law Board. They will confirm the above, even if reluctantly. For the size and numbers of mosques has now become a matter of honor.

Then there is the second, perhaps even more critical, issue. Everyone is aware of the quantum increase in sectarian thought and practice among the Muslims of South Asia. The evil that started in Pakistan, particularly during the Ziaul Haq regime, has now well established itself in India too. Thankfully, the murder and mayhem that are now routine in Pakistan have not yet happened in India. Indian Sunnis are not killing Indian Shi’ahs, nor have the Indian Barelvis gone gunning after Indian Wahhabis. But anyone who reads Urdu journals knows that sectarian intolerance has increased, and no effort to curb it is in sight.

I first visited Pakistan in 1980, and well recall what some friends in Lahore told me was happening in the Old City. After the ‘isha (late evening) prayers, they told me, the Barelvis and the Deobandis regularly engaged in denouncing each other, using their azaan amplification systems, and filling the air with choice imprecations. May friend had said that with a smile. Now, of course, that smile is long gone. In fact, when I was in Lahore last year, and staying with a friend in an affluent neighborhood, I heard an azaan that I had never heard before. Later I found out that Barelvis in Pakistan now have their own special azaan, and the additional material was put in basically to annoy the Deobandis. Probably the same is now happening in Bareli and Mumbai, too, but until last it had not reached Barabanki.

Public display of religiosity is now common place. Piety that used to be expressed privately or through public humanitarian acts has now been replaced by a religiosity that is much more about pomp and glory, about self-exaltation, than humility and service. The cry one hears is of shaukat-e Islam, ‘Glory of Islam. ‘Anything that detracts from that presumed ‘glory’ becomes ‘intolerable.’ So Sonu’s complaint against the use of loudspeakers was turned into an attack on Islam’s ‘honour,’ and had to be retaliated against by demanding that he should be denuded of his ‘honour.’ ‘Shave his head off,’ brayed one savior of Islam, ‘Put a garland of shoes around his neck.’ Now I only wish Sonu Nigam had saved the clippings and mailed them to his detractor.

More seriously, it is about time administrators across the country began to enforce the existing laws. Put strict limits on amplification. Enforce hours. Punish those who break the laws. And the ‘leaders,’ political and religious, should also make sure that the presumed piety of one party does not put undue burden on the rest of the citizens of the country.

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C M Naim is Professor Emeritus, South Asian Languages and Civilizations - The University of Chicago, United States and is the author of two collections of topical essays: A Killing in Ferozewala and The Muslim League in Barabanki published by City Press Karachi

URL: http://www.newageislam.com/islamic-society/c-m-naim-for-new-age-islam/listen-to-sonu-nigam,-please/d/110842




TOTAL COMMENTS:-   3


  • @zishan

    There is only one problem with your satirical tolerance and that is unholy as well:

    Your TOLERENCE of others INTOLERENCE towards you makes them SELFISH and ignore the golden rule: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”.

    In civilised world it is required that noise pollution – like all other pollution - be minimised and kept under control and so there are Noise Abatement Acts enacted to that effect.

    Everybody owes everybody else a harmless peaceful coexistence.


    By Rashid Samnakay - 5/1/2017 6:47:17 PM



  • I live at a place nearby railway track line. every after five or ten minutes a train passes with raising too much noises. 
    I am not a traveller. so please stop these trains.

    in my street also, some people listen to songs of sonu nigam with high volume, i dislike sonu nigam songs, so please stop sonu nigam song 

    also in some temples all night long, or sometimes all day long, bells of temples sound too high, i am not hindu, so please stop these sounds, 

    once prinyanka chopra said she liked azan and felt peace while listening to it.....but sonu nigam is differerent 

    there are too many problems which can be solved without looking for solution, what we need to do is simply ignore the matter , and tolerate every thing 
    but if you can not tolerate then i too have questions on your intolerance 
    a sign is enough for aqalamand 

    By Zishan - 4/20/2017 10:20:53 PM



  • Not only our religious rites but also our festivals and weddings tend to be very loud and unhealthy for our ears as well as for our psychological health. Our drums, gongs, conches and loudspeakers show scant concern for the comfort of others. Pre-dawn use of loudspeakers is especially reprehensible. Both Hindus and Muslims need to learn to keep their faiths in a private space and not project them in the public arena. Neither Hinduism nor Islam looks kindly on causing  discomfort to others.


    By Ghulam Mohiyuddin - 4/20/2017 12:16:40 PM



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