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Allama Sir Muhammad Iqbal
The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam
Biography, Audio
Vivekananda
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The Quran: A New Translation - The eternal present tense
Preface: The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam By Dr. Muhammad Iqbal
Lecture 1: Knowledge and Religious Experience
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Unity among Muslims and Dr. Zakir Naik's Evil: A Point of View
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This Islamic website offers facts about Islam and Muslims, Islam way and Islamic ideology. Online Islam - Latest Islamic World News, Articles on Radical Islamism & Jihad and Islam, Terrorism and Jihad
     
Islam,Terrorism and Jihad
29 Nov 2008, NewAgeIslam.Com
Can we Trust Pakistani commitment to fight Jihadi Terrorism?

 

Like his predecessors for a long time, and like several heads of government and the state of Pakistan, Pakistani foreign minister Yousaf Raza Qureshi has reiterated Pakistan’s determination to wipe out terrorists. Using a language meant to reassure India, the visiting minister says, “They [terrorists] have no face. They have no colour, no class, no creed, no religion, no nothing. They are barbarians. They are inhuman and we have to collectively eliminate them.” Qureshi has continued his visit reassuring India of every possible cooperation. Both President Zardari and Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gillani have made assurance calls to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.

But the question before us is: Can we trust Pakistan? Promises like this have been made before. But the factories of terror in Murdike and elsewhere continue to churn out terrorists. No action is taken against terrorists who claim to be fighting only against India. It seems while Islamabad will fight against terrorists who fight against Pakistani state or the US interests, it will leave alone organisations like Lashkar-e-Tayyaba that fight against India alone. Mr. Qureishi says his government practises no such discrimination.

Can we trust them? asks Sultan Shahin, Editor, NewAgeIslam.com in this debating forum free for all its readers to participate.

Pak will cooperate with India at every level: Qureshi

Atishay Abbhi / CNN-IBN

Published on Sat, Nov 29, 2008 at 00:40, Updated on Sat, Nov 29, 2008 at 01:00 in World section

NEIGHBOURHOOD STANCE: Pakistani foreign minister Yousaf Raza Qureshi has continued his visit reassuring India of every possible cooperation.

New Delhi: Once the operation to flush out the terrorists from the Mumbai hotels are over, the focus will shift to the investigations.

As it happens, the Pakistan Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi is in India in New Delhi and he said India shouldn't blame Pakistan and called for a united stand on terror.

Qureshi said, “Today India is mourning. Yesterday Pakistan was mourning and tomorrow, we don't know who that will be. Let us share our problems. There should not be any blame game. Pakistan is willing to cooperate with India at every level.”

Just couple of hours after the Pakistani foreign minister’s statement, it was anything but peace.

Terrorists unleashed every piece of artillery in the heart of Mumbai to carry out the most coordinated terror attack in India and with all the evidence stacking up pointing towards the Pakistani link, where do India-Pakistan relations go from here?

Some of the men behind the attack, according to initial reports, are Pakistani nationals trained in maritime terrorism in Karachi by Lashkar-E-Toiba (LeT).

An angry India conveyed to Pakistan that it has all the evidence pointing towards the Pakistani link.

External affairs minister Pranab Mukherjee said, “The preliminary information we have received so far points to the certainty that some of Pakistani elements are involved in the activity. We ask Pakistan to arrest these people and put an end to these things.”

Meanwhile Qureshi says, “They have no face. They have no colour, no class, no creed, no religion, no nothing. They are barbarians. They are inhuman and we have to collectively eliminate them.”

Attacks in Mumbai have once again landed India and Pakistan in an embarrassing face-off.

The new lull in the relation has cemented the fear of the failure the joint Anti-terror mechanism.

Apparently, Pakistan is feeling the heat not just from India but around the world.

It is now making efforts to prove itself and is sending ISI chief to India to help in investigations.

Qureshi has continued his visit reassuring India of every possible cooperation.

Both president Zardari and prime minister Yousaf Raza Gillani have made assurance calls to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.

However, the PM without naming Pakistan, warned that the neighbour may have to pay a price if it continues allowing its territory to be used against India.

URL: http://www.newageislam.com/NewAgeIslamWarOnTerror_1.aspx?ArticleID=1029

 

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COMMENTS
Abdul Alim

Deepak Chopra on Mumbai attacks: It's not enough for Pakistan to condemn it. Pakistan should cooperate with India in uprooting this. They should be part of the surgery that is going to happen.

 

They (Indians) cannot blame Pakistan. They should ask Pakistan's help. In turn Pakistan should stop just condemning this. They should say what are we going to do?

 

Posted by: "Abdul Alim"

Fri Nov 28, 2008 8:24 am (PST)

CNN LARRY KING LIVE: Terrorist Attacks in India

Aired November 26, 2008 - 21:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

LARRY KING, HOST: Tonight, breaking news -- terror attacks rip through the commercial center of India. Americans and other Westerners are the targets. Scores are dead. Hundreds are injured. Hostages are held at gunpoint. Hotels, a hospital and a train station all scenes of chaos and carnage. Mumbai -- a city under siege. Live reports and late-breaking developments right from the scene right now on LARRY KING LIVE.

Good evening.

This is not what we planned tonight.

Let's go to Dr. Deepak Chopra, the physician, philosopher. His new book is "Jesus: A Story of Enlightenment."

Where were you born in India, Deepak?

DEEPAK CHOPRA, AUTHOR: I was born in Delhi, but I have been in these hotels many, many times. I have stayed there, so I know the scene, I know the restaurants. I have been trying to get in touch with my friends and relatives, some of whom I have spoken to, some of whom I can't speak to. The lines are jammed. We're texting each other.

A friend of mine from Egypt was in the restaurant at the Taj hotel when the firing started and somehow she managed to avoid the fray, hid in a basement and is now holed up in a room which is right next to the Taj hotel and is waiting to be told what to do.

The situation is complex, Larry, because it could inflame to proportions that we cannot even imagine. It has to be contained. We now recognize that this is a global problem, with only a global effort can solve this.

And you know, one of the things that I think is happening is that these militant terrorist groups are actually terrified that Obama's gestures to the rest of the Muslim world may actually overturn the tables on them by alienating them from the rest of the Muslim world, so they're reacting to this.

You know, this is Obama's opportunity to actually harness the help of the Muslims.

You know, there's 1.8 billion Muslims in the world. That's 25 percent of the population of the world. It's the fastest growing religion in the world. We cannot, if we do not appease and actually recruit the help of this Muslim world, we're going to have a problem on our hands.

And we cannot go after the wrong people, as we did after 9/11, because then the whole collateral damage that occurs actually aggravates the situation.

In India, this is particularly inflammatory, because there's a rise of Hindu fundamentalism. We saw what that did in Gujarat, where, you know, Muslims were scorched and they were killed, and there was almost a genocide of the Muslims.

India has 150 million Muslims. That's more Muslims in India than in Pakistan. So this is an opportunity right now for India and Pakistan to recognize this is their common problem. It's not a Muslim problem right now; it's a global problem.

KING: Deepak?

CHOPRA: Yes?

KING: We'll be getting back to you. Don't leave us.

CHOPRA: OK.

KING: One quick thing. When did Bombay become Mumbai?

CHOPRA: After the British left. Bombay was a British name, so the original name was Mumbai, and it was reclaimed. KING: They went back to their original name.

CHOPRA: Yes, yes. Mumbai -- Bombay is the Anglicized version of Mumbai.

KING: We'll take a break and be right back.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KING: We're back with Dr. Deepak Chopra, the physician, philosopher, spiritual adviser. His new book, by the way, it's terrific, "Jesus: A Story of Enlightenment."

Do you think that this is just the beginning, that there's a potential impact, or more?

CHOPRA: There is a potential impact of a lot more carnage. But it can be contained. And right now, one of the questions, you know, after I heard Barbara Starr talking about how coordinated this is, that there are militant groups that cross international boundaries, is who is financing this? Where is the money coming from? We have to ask very serious, honest questions. What role do we have in this? Are our petrodollars funding both sides of this war on terrorism? Why are we not asking the Saudis where that money is going that we give them? Is it going through this supply chain to Pakistan?

It's not enough for Pakistan to condemn it. Pakistan should cooperate with India in uprooting this. They should be part of the surgery that is going to happen.

It's not enough for Indians to blame Pakistanis. Indians should actually ask the Pakistanis to help them. And it's not enough for us to worry about Westerners being killed and Americans being killed. Every life that is -- is precious over there. We have got to get rid of this idea that this is an American problem or a Western problem. It's a global problem, and we need a global solution, and we need the help of all the Muslims, 25 percent of the world's population, to help us uproot this problem.

KING: What does India immediately do?

CHOPRA: India at this moment has to contain any reactive violence from the fundamentalist Hindus, which is very likely and possible. So India has to condemn that by not blaming local Muslims. They have to identify the exact groups.

And the world has to be very careful that they don't go after the wrong people. Because if you go after the wrong people, you convert moderates into extremists. It happens every time, and retribution against innocent people just because they have the same religion actually aggravates and perpetuates the problem.

KING: Are you pessimistic?

CHOPRA: I think Mr. Obama has a real opportunity here, but a challenging opportunity, a creative opportunity.

Get rid of the phrase "war on terrorism." Ask for a creative solution in which we all participate.

KING: Is it because the war on terrorism really can never be won because the terrorists (inaudible)?

CHOPRA: Because it's an oxymoron. It's an oxymoron, Larry, a war on war, a war on terrorism.

You know, terrorists call mechanized death from 35,000 feet above sea level with a press of a button also terror. We don't call it that, because our soldiers are wearing uniforms. They don't see what is happening, and innocent people are being killed. So, you know, terror is a term that you apply to the other.

KING: Thanks, Deepak Chopra, as always, extraordinarily enlightening.

We'll be back with more on this horrendous day. Don't go away.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

One quick, closing word with Deepak Chopra.

Deepak, are you optimistic that the Indian government will be successful with this?

CHOPRA: I think so but they have to change their attitude. They cannot blame Pakistan. They should ask Pakistan's help. In turn Pakistan should stop just condemning this. They should say what are we going to do?

We should be asking the Saudis what they're going to do about it. And we should all be asking the moderate Muslims. If you are still moderate, stop condemning this but do something about this cancer in your own family.

KING: And do you expect Barack Obama to have something to do with this or not?

CHOPRA: I think, you know, the terrorists are actually petrified of Barack Obama because he might overturn the tables on them by harnessing the sympathy of the Muslim world which does not like this.

KING: Thank you, Deepak. Deepak Chopra.

http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0811/26/lkl.01.html

ALSO SEE:

Muslim Public Affairs Council Condemns Mumbai Terror Attacks

http://www.mpac.org/article.php?id=743

Sunita Raina

from          Sunita Raina  to     Sultan Shahin <Editor@NewAgeIslam.com>

date        29 November 2008 09:15

subject   Jihadis were Pakistani citizens..

 

"Ajmal has revealed the name of his fellow jihadis all Pakistani citizens.........The account of Ajmal also strengthens the doubt of the complicity of powerful elements in the Pakistani establishment"

 

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Arrested_terrorist_says_gang_hoped_to_get_away/articleshow/msid-3771598,curpg-1.cms

Razi Rizvi

Date:   Sat, 29 Nov 2008 16:43:24 +0530 [04:43PM IST]
From:  Razi Rizvi
To:  Sultan Shahin <editor@newageislam.com>
Thursday, November 27, 2008

The Wahhabi Terrorists in Mumbai?

It is very much unfortunate and severely condemnable the terrorist attacks going on in Mumbai since last night. These savages are humans in disguise, Satanic in nature. The enemies of the humanity. These killers emulate Yazid, Shimr, Ibne Ziyad, Ibne Muljim, Saddam, Osama etc etc. They have no mercy for innocent women and children. These blood suckers call themselves Muslims and followers of Prophet Mohammad (s.a.w), but have no respect for the Prophet (s.a.w.) and claim that He (s.a.w.) was like an ordinary human being like them. These Pseudo Muslims (PM) forget that the holy Prophet (s.a.w.) was mercy for the entire universe. They are the friends of the oppressors and tyrants, and they pray for the forgiveness of the tyrants like Yazeed. These PMs have defamed Islam by their wrong beliefs and methods and use force on others to implement the obedience to Islamic laws. These people have typical and absurd dress code appearing like blokes. These PMs are breed hatred among the mankind and the whole world know that where they are financed from. These are known as WAHHABIS.

Md Ahmad

Pakistan denies Mumbai involvement, pledges cooperation
by Nasir Jaffry
Nasir Jaffry   – Fri Nov 28, 5:36 pm ET
ISLAMABAD (AFP) – Pakistan struck a conciliatory tone Friday and denied accusations of involvement in the Mumbai attacks but the foreign minister urged India not to get "sucked" into a blame game.
Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani pledged in a Friday telephone call to his Indian counterpart that he would send the chief of the country's powerful intelligence service to India to help investigate the attacks.
And in a televised press conference Friday evening in which he detailed his conversation with Indian premier Manmohan Singh, Gilani again denied Pakistan had anything to do with Wednesday's atrocity, which killed about 155 people.
"I am saying it again, that we have nothing to do with the attacks in Mumbai," Gilani said. "We condemn it, the whole nation has condemned it. We are already the victim of terrorism and extremism."
Gilani went on to speak of his commitment during the phone call to send the Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI) chief to help Indian investigators and share intelligence.
"When we are not involved, we have nothing to hide. Therefore one should not feel guilty," Gilani said.
The pledge to send the ISI Lieutenant-General Ahmed Shuja Pasha to Mumbai is a significant gesture by Pakistan's government, which was elected to power in February, ending the eight-year military rule of General Pervez Musharraf.
It is also notable because India has in the past accused the ISI of helping attacks on Indian targets by militants, including July's bombing of the Indian embassy in Afghan capital Kabul.
Gilani said that Singh had told him that a preliminary investigation indicated the attack originated from the Pakistani city of Karachi.
"I said, 'Mister Prime Minister, we want to maintain excellent relations with our neighbour. We have to focus on real issues -- both are poor countries'," Gilani told reporters.
"Both the countries are facing the problem of poverty, hunger and disease. We have to focus on real issues and we don't want to fight with each other."
Their conversation came a day after the Indian premier said in a television address that planners of the atrocity were based "outside the country" and warned against "neighbours" providing a haven to anti-India militants.
Although he did not specifically say Pakistan, his statement was widely interpreted to be a veiled accusation and triggered many denials from Pakistan's government.
"In previous cases they have acted like this, but later it all proved wrong," Pakistan's defence minister Ahmed Mukhtar told AFP, referring to previous claims from India of Pakistani involvement in terrorist attacks.
Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari made a separate telephone call to Singh Friday and pledged his government would cooperate with India "in exposing and apprehending the culprits and the masterminds behind the attacks," official news agency the Associated Press of Pakistan reported.
Meanwhile, speaking in New Delhi, where he was on an official visit, foreign minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi condemned the attacks but said India had spoken too swiftly in blaming "elements in Pakistan" for the attacks and should avoid a "knee-jerk" response.
"My honest view is the government should have reflected more in coming to its conclusions," Qureshi told a gathering of female journalists.
"Let us build a new relationship or we could get sucked back into a situation that we have been living in for 60 years and that will be a tragedy as large as this one," he said.
"We should avoid a replay of that beaten track of the blame game," said Qureshi.
Officials throughout Pakistan's government have deplored the Mumbai attacks and denied any role in the plot, which could unhinge recent efforts to reach a peace agreement between the two countries over the disputed area of Kashmir.
Pakistani press on Friday also urged India to stop blaming its neighbour.
Local English-language daily The News led with the headline: "India gives Pakistan a dirty look."
"Indian intelligence, under fire for failing to pick up on the threat, is anxious to lay blame elsewhere," the newspaper said.
An editorial in the Daily Times newspaper said the televised remarks by India's premier seemed "to be an attempt by Dr. Singh to pre-empt criticism from the Hindu right wing".
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081128/wl_sthasia_afp/indiaattackspakistan

Md Ahmad

Pakistan denies Mumbai involvement, pledges cooperation

Agence France-Presse | 11/28/2008
ISLAMABAD - Pakistan struck a conciliatory tone Friday and denied accusations of involvement in the Mumbai attacks, while Pakistani press warned India to stop pointing the finger of blame across the border.
Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani pledged in a Friday telephone call to his Indian counterpart that he would send the chief of the country's powerful intelligence service to India to help investigate the attacks.
And in a televised press conference Friday evening in which he detailed his conversation with Indian premier Manmohan Singh, Gilani again denied Pakistan had anything to do with Wednesday's atrocity, which killed about 135 people.
"I am saying it again, that we have nothing to do with the attacks in Mumbai," Gilani said. "We condemn it, the whole nation has condemned it. We are already the victim of terrorism and extremism."
Gilani went on to speak of his commitment during the phone call to send the Inter Service Intelligence (ISI) chief to help Indian investigators and share intelligence.
"When we are not involved, we have nothing to hide. Therefore one should not feel guilty," Gilani said.
The pledge to send the ISI lieutenant general Ahmed Shuja Pasha to Mumbai is a significant gesture by Pakistan's government, which was elected to power in February ending the eight-year military rule of General Pervez Musharraf.
It is also notable because India has in the past accused the ISI of helping attacks on Indian targets by militants, including last July's bombing of the Indian embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan.
Gilani said that Singh had told him that a preliminary investigation indicated the attack originated from the Pakistani city Karachi.
"I said, 'Mister Prime Minister, we want to maintain excellent relations with our neighbour. We have to focus on real issues -- both are poor countries.'" Gilani told reporters.
"Both the countries are facing the problem of poverty, hunger and disease. We have to focus on real issues and we don't want to fight with each other."
Their conversation came a day after the Indian premier said in a television address that planners of the atrocity were based "outside the country" and warned against "neighbours" providing a haven to anti-India militants.
Although he did not specifically say Pakistan, his statement was widely interpreted to be a veiled accusation and triggered many denials from Pakistan's government.
"In previous cases they have acted like this, but later it all proved wrong," defence minister Ahmed Mukhtar told AFP, referring to previous claims from India of Pakistani involvement in terrorist attacks.
Pakistani president Asif Ali Zardari made a separate telephone call to Singh Friday and pledged his government would cooperate with India "in exposing and apprehending the culprits and the masterminds behind the attacks," official news agency the Associated Press of Pakistan reported.
Officials throughout Pakistan's government have deplored the Mumbai attacks and denied any role in the plot, which could unhinge recent efforts to reach a peace agreement between the two countries over the disputed area of Kashmir.
Pakistani press on Friday also urged India to stop blaming its neighbour as it gave prominent coverage of the coordinated terrorist attacks.
Local English-language daily The News led with the headline: "India gives Pakistan a dirty look."
"Indian intelligence, under fire for failing to pick up on the threat, is anxious to lay blame elsewhere," the newspaper said.
An editorial in the Daily Times newspaper said the televised remarks by India's premier seemed "to be an attempt by Dr. Singh to pre-empt criticism from the Hindu right wing".
"Ongoing investigations into some (past) terrorist attacks that were alternately blamed on Indian Muslims and Pakistan have shown that they were actually carried out by a Hindu terrorist network," the editorial said.
Pakistani newspapers universally condemned the violence in Mumbai, and urged Pakistan and India to work together to combat terrorism.
"Although one can understand the anger and concern which is widely felt, one would still advise the exercise of constraint in this hour of crisis," Pakistan's influential English-language daily Dawn newspaper said.
"There is need for confidence-building between the two countries."
http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/world/11/28/08/pakistan-denies-mumbai-involvement-pledges-cooperation

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