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Allama Sir Muhammad Iqbal
The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam
Biography, Audio
Vivekananda
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This Islamic website offers facts about Islam and Muslims, Islam way and Islamic ideology. Online Islam - Latest Islamic World News, Articles on Radical Islamism & Jihad and Islam, Terrorism and Jihad
     
Islam,Terrorism and Jihad
29 Nov 2008, NewAgeIslam.Com
Can we Trust Pakistani commitment to fight Jihadi Terrorism?
COMMENTS
Dr. Shahid Ali Khan

From: Dr. Shahid Ali Khan To: Sultan Shahin <Editor@NewAgeIslam.com>
Date: Sat, Nov 29, 2008 at 2:49 AM
Subject: US MOSQUES HOLD CONDOLENCE MEETINGS FOR RABBI & OTHER TERROR VICTIMS

Contact persons:
Dr. Shahid Ali Khan, Habeeb Ahmed and Dr. Shaik Ubaid
Tel: 516-567-0783  Email: <su204@aol.com
 
Indian Muslims Held Special Prayers and Condolence Meetings for the Victims of the Mumbai Terror Attacks
 
New York, November 28, 2008 -  Friday is the holy day for Muslims and this Friday after Thanksgiving was a day of sadness for Muslim Indian-Americans. Many imams (prayer leaders) in the New York and New Jersey areas condemned this heinous terror attack against the civilians in Mumbai, India in their sermons. According to media reports more than 150 civilians were killed and hundreds more wounded in the well coordinated attacks by well trained militant terrorists.
 
Area mosques that held these services include Long Island Islamic Center in Westbury and Upper Westchester Islamic Society in Thornwood.  Similar services were held in other parts of the country.
 
The Muslim community expressed its outrage at the killings of the Brooklyn based Rabbi and his wife and other American citizens. Dr. Shaik Ubaid of Indian Minorities Advocacy Network expressed his heartfelt condolences to the family of the rabbi and other victims.
 
Dr. Ubaid lauded the valor of  the slain Anti Terrorism Squad Chief Hemant Karkare who was courageously heading the recently publicized inquiry against the recent Malegaon bomb blasts in which Hindu supremacists including military officers and some religious leaders were implicated. "We must be proud of the selfless sacrifice of the under-paid and under-armed special forces who were let down by corrupt politicians and incompetent intelligence agencies, and still manage to save hundreds of civilians," said Dr. Ubaid.
 
Saeed Patel, a well-known community leader congratulated the Indians for staying united and not succumbing to the designs of the terrorists and of the extremist politicians who unsuccessfully tried to use the terror attacks to foment retaliatory violence against civilians. "This sad and savage tragedy brought out the best in the common folks." " The terrorists have no religion but their victims were people of Hindu, Islamic, Christian, Sikh, Parsi, Jewish, Buddhists, Jain and other faiths as well as atheists. Their humanity was their common bond," he said.
 
Many Muslim leaders will also be participating in the upcoming inter-faith condolence services.

COALITION AGAINST GENOCIDE ALSO CONDEMNED THE TERRO ATTACKS. HERE IS THEIR PRESS RELEASE
INDIAN-AMERICANS CONDEMN THE MUMBAI TERROR ATTACKS AND SEEK EFFECTIVE GOVERNMENT ACTION TO STOP TERRORISM

November 28, 2008 

As a broad-based coalition committed to promoting justice, peace and human rights, we denounce in strongest possible terms the dastardly terror attacks in Mumbai and demand that the highest echelons of  political decision makers in India, be held accountable for what seems to be widespread and escalating trend of abject failures in protecting precious lives of ordinary citizens and preserving the pluralistic fabric of India.

We express our deepest gratitude to the thousands of security personnel for their courageous and selfless service in fighting these well-planned and coordinated attacks. We are deeply moved by still-emerging stories of the heroism and professionalism of the staffs at the affected hotels. Our hearts go out to the families of fallen heroes and the civilian victims.  We also note with a sense of great pride and satisfaction, that Indian citizens have by and large maintained harmony, understanding and resolve  in the face of successive acts of terrorism, thereby foiling the perpetrators' principal objective.  We have no doubt that it is this unique strength of ordinary people which keeps India resilient, vibrant and united in the face of mounting internal and external challenges.  We call upon all political forces in India to build upon this unique character rather than foment divisive agenda for short term gains.

We are alarmed by the reports of foreign groups being involved in the attacks. We urge the government of India to identify these foreign groups and to reassure the nation that such threats are being dealt with in an effective manner.

Recent years have witnessed an alarming growth in the number of groups committing highly orchestrated acts of terrorism and violence against innocent civilians and public institutions.  As evident from this still unfolding tragedy,  a coordinated and open attack on this scale by a handful of people, completely paralyzing Mumbai – India's largest city -  points to major and multiple break downs across the internal and external intelligence agencies, center-state coordination on law and order, as well as political-bureaucratic-civil society continuum.

 As non-resident Indians, we note how India has come to be recognized as a rising world class power as a result of successive recent governments assiduously pursuing and successfully accomplishing programs to advance the country's profile on the international stage.  However, we also note with dismay and frustration that similar single minded focus and resolve seems to be lacking in successive governments, when it comes to ensuring the life, liberty and livelihood of ordinary citizens. We therefore call upon leaders across political spectrum towards a renewed sense of single minded focus on this very fundamental and basic purpose of government.

 While acknowledging the complexity of the situation and concerned about frequent terrorist attacks in recent months,  we feel nevertheless compelled to request Prime Minister Mr. Manmohan Singh to make  much needed changes in the senior ranks of the government officials and the government security apparatus to ensure that the citizens and institutions of India are fully protected from acts of terrorism.

 COALITION AGAINST GENOCIDE - A Coalition of Concerned Indian-Americans


Contact:

Gautam Desai [<urvigautam@hotmail.com]
George Abraham [<georgeabraham2003@yahoo.com]
Kaleem Kawaja [<kaleemkawaja@hotmail.com]
 

Endorsing Organizations:

Aligarh Alumni Association, Washington, DC
American Muslim Physicians of Indian Origin (AMPI), Chicago. IL.
Association of Indian Muslims in America (AIM), Washington DC; (<www.AimAmerica.org)
Campaign to Stop Funding Hate (CSFH); (<www.stopfundinghate.org)
Friends of South Asia (FOSA), San Jose, California; (<www.friendsofsouthasia.org)
Gujarati Muslim Association of America (GMAA), Chicago, IL
India Foundation, Michigan
Indian Minorities Advocacy Network (ImanNet), New York
Indian Muslim Council (IMC), Morton Grove, Illinois (<www.imc-usa.org)
Indian Muslim Education Foundation of North America (IMEFNA), Chicago, IL
International Service Society, Michigan
Muslim Youth Awareness Alliance (MYAA), Michigan
Non-Resident Indians for a Secular and Harmonious India (NRI-SAHI), Michigan
Sikh American Heritage Organization, Wayne, IL.
South Asian Network for Secularism and Democracy (SANSAD), Vancouver, Canada (<www.sansad.org)
Supporters of Human Rights in India (SHRI), Minnesota.
The Coalition for a Secular Democratic India (CSDI), Chicago. IL
Vaishnava Center for Enlightenment, Michigan


Individual Endorsements:

George Abraham
Habeb Ahmed
Dr. Syed S. Ahmed
Dr. Waheeduddin Ahmed
Girish Agrawal
Rasheed Ahmed
Dr Shahid Ali
Khalid Azam
Dr. Chinmoy Banerjee
Dr. Angana Chatterji
Nasir Chippa
Gautam Desai
Shalini Gera
Sapna Gupta
Imtiazuddin
Kaleem Kawaja
Attaulla Khan
Dr. Fazal Khan
Dr. Hyder Khan
Dr. Shahid Ali Khan
Dr Wasim Khan
Alex V. Koshy
Dr. Kursheed A. Mallick
Ghulam Mansuri
Biju Mathew
Saeed Patel
Shrikumar Poddar
Syed Azmatullah Quadri
Raju Rajagopal
Ravi Ravishankar
Dr. Shaik Sayeed
Dr. Hari Sharma
Ramkumar Sridharan
Raja Swamy
Dr. Shaik Ubaid
Firoz Vohra

Razi Rizvi

Date:   Sat, 29 Nov 2008 16:43:24 +0530 [04:43PM IST]
From:  Razi Rizvi
To:  Sultan Shahin <editor@newageislam.com>
Thursday, November 27, 2008

The Wahhabi Terrorists in Mumbai?

It is very much unfortunate and severely condemnable the terrorist attacks going on in Mumbai since last night. These savages are humans in disguise, Satanic in nature. The enemies of the humanity. These killers emulate Yazid, Shimr, Ibne Ziyad, Ibne Muljim, Saddam, Osama etc etc. They have no mercy for innocent women and children. These blood suckers call themselves Muslims and followers of Prophet Mohammad (s.a.w), but have no respect for the Prophet (s.a.w.) and claim that He (s.a.w.) was like an ordinary human being like them. These Pseudo Muslims (PM) forget that the holy Prophet (s.a.w.) was mercy for the entire universe. They are the friends of the oppressors and tyrants, and they pray for the forgiveness of the tyrants like Yazeed. These PMs have defamed Islam by their wrong beliefs and methods and use force on others to implement the obedience to Islamic laws. These people have typical and absurd dress code appearing like blokes. These PMs are breed hatred among the mankind and the whole world know that where they are financed from. These are known as WAHHABIS.

Md Ahmad

Pakistan denies Mumbai involvement, pledges cooperation
by Nasir Jaffry
Nasir Jaffry   – Fri Nov 28, 5:36 pm ET
ISLAMABAD (AFP) – Pakistan struck a conciliatory tone Friday and denied accusations of involvement in the Mumbai attacks but the foreign minister urged India not to get "sucked" into a blame game.
Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani pledged in a Friday telephone call to his Indian counterpart that he would send the chief of the country's powerful intelligence service to India to help investigate the attacks.
And in a televised press conference Friday evening in which he detailed his conversation with Indian premier Manmohan Singh, Gilani again denied Pakistan had anything to do with Wednesday's atrocity, which killed about 155 people.
"I am saying it again, that we have nothing to do with the attacks in Mumbai," Gilani said. "We condemn it, the whole nation has condemned it. We are already the victim of terrorism and extremism."
Gilani went on to speak of his commitment during the phone call to send the Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI) chief to help Indian investigators and share intelligence.
"When we are not involved, we have nothing to hide. Therefore one should not feel guilty," Gilani said.
The pledge to send the ISI Lieutenant-General Ahmed Shuja Pasha to Mumbai is a significant gesture by Pakistan's government, which was elected to power in February, ending the eight-year military rule of General Pervez Musharraf.
It is also notable because India has in the past accused the ISI of helping attacks on Indian targets by militants, including July's bombing of the Indian embassy in Afghan capital Kabul.
Gilani said that Singh had told him that a preliminary investigation indicated the attack originated from the Pakistani city of Karachi.
"I said, 'Mister Prime Minister, we want to maintain excellent relations with our neighbour. We have to focus on real issues -- both are poor countries'," Gilani told reporters.
"Both the countries are facing the problem of poverty, hunger and disease. We have to focus on real issues and we don't want to fight with each other."
Their conversation came a day after the Indian premier said in a television address that planners of the atrocity were based "outside the country" and warned against "neighbours" providing a haven to anti-India militants.
Although he did not specifically say Pakistan, his statement was widely interpreted to be a veiled accusation and triggered many denials from Pakistan's government.
"In previous cases they have acted like this, but later it all proved wrong," Pakistan's defence minister Ahmed Mukhtar told AFP, referring to previous claims from India of Pakistani involvement in terrorist attacks.
Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari made a separate telephone call to Singh Friday and pledged his government would cooperate with India "in exposing and apprehending the culprits and the masterminds behind the attacks," official news agency the Associated Press of Pakistan reported.
Meanwhile, speaking in New Delhi, where he was on an official visit, foreign minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi condemned the attacks but said India had spoken too swiftly in blaming "elements in Pakistan" for the attacks and should avoid a "knee-jerk" response.
"My honest view is the government should have reflected more in coming to its conclusions," Qureshi told a gathering of female journalists.
"Let us build a new relationship or we could get sucked back into a situation that we have been living in for 60 years and that will be a tragedy as large as this one," he said.
"We should avoid a replay of that beaten track of the blame game," said Qureshi.
Officials throughout Pakistan's government have deplored the Mumbai attacks and denied any role in the plot, which could unhinge recent efforts to reach a peace agreement between the two countries over the disputed area of Kashmir.
Pakistani press on Friday also urged India to stop blaming its neighbour.
Local English-language daily The News led with the headline: "India gives Pakistan a dirty look."
"Indian intelligence, under fire for failing to pick up on the threat, is anxious to lay blame elsewhere," the newspaper said.
An editorial in the Daily Times newspaper said the televised remarks by India's premier seemed "to be an attempt by Dr. Singh to pre-empt criticism from the Hindu right wing".
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081128/wl_sthasia_afp/indiaattackspakistan

Md Ahmad

Pakistan denies Mumbai involvement, pledges cooperation

Agence France-Presse | 11/28/2008
ISLAMABAD - Pakistan struck a conciliatory tone Friday and denied accusations of involvement in the Mumbai attacks, while Pakistani press warned India to stop pointing the finger of blame across the border.
Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani pledged in a Friday telephone call to his Indian counterpart that he would send the chief of the country's powerful intelligence service to India to help investigate the attacks.
And in a televised press conference Friday evening in which he detailed his conversation with Indian premier Manmohan Singh, Gilani again denied Pakistan had anything to do with Wednesday's atrocity, which killed about 135 people.
"I am saying it again, that we have nothing to do with the attacks in Mumbai," Gilani said. "We condemn it, the whole nation has condemned it. We are already the victim of terrorism and extremism."
Gilani went on to speak of his commitment during the phone call to send the Inter Service Intelligence (ISI) chief to help Indian investigators and share intelligence.
"When we are not involved, we have nothing to hide. Therefore one should not feel guilty," Gilani said.
The pledge to send the ISI lieutenant general Ahmed Shuja Pasha to Mumbai is a significant gesture by Pakistan's government, which was elected to power in February ending the eight-year military rule of General Pervez Musharraf.
It is also notable because India has in the past accused the ISI of helping attacks on Indian targets by militants, including last July's bombing of the Indian embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan.
Gilani said that Singh had told him that a preliminary investigation indicated the attack originated from the Pakistani city Karachi.
"I said, 'Mister Prime Minister, we want to maintain excellent relations with our neighbour. We have to focus on real issues -- both are poor countries.'" Gilani told reporters.
"Both the countries are facing the problem of poverty, hunger and disease. We have to focus on real issues and we don't want to fight with each other."
Their conversation came a day after the Indian premier said in a television address that planners of the atrocity were based "outside the country" and warned against "neighbours" providing a haven to anti-India militants.
Although he did not specifically say Pakistan, his statement was widely interpreted to be a veiled accusation and triggered many denials from Pakistan's government.
"In previous cases they have acted like this, but later it all proved wrong," defence minister Ahmed Mukhtar told AFP, referring to previous claims from India of Pakistani involvement in terrorist attacks.
Pakistani president Asif Ali Zardari made a separate telephone call to Singh Friday and pledged his government would cooperate with India "in exposing and apprehending the culprits and the masterminds behind the attacks," official news agency the Associated Press of Pakistan reported.
Officials throughout Pakistan's government have deplored the Mumbai attacks and denied any role in the plot, which could unhinge recent efforts to reach a peace agreement between the two countries over the disputed area of Kashmir.
Pakistani press on Friday also urged India to stop blaming its neighbour as it gave prominent coverage of the coordinated terrorist attacks.
Local English-language daily The News led with the headline: "India gives Pakistan a dirty look."
"Indian intelligence, under fire for failing to pick up on the threat, is anxious to lay blame elsewhere," the newspaper said.
An editorial in the Daily Times newspaper said the televised remarks by India's premier seemed "to be an attempt by Dr. Singh to pre-empt criticism from the Hindu right wing".
"Ongoing investigations into some (past) terrorist attacks that were alternately blamed on Indian Muslims and Pakistan have shown that they were actually carried out by a Hindu terrorist network," the editorial said.
Pakistani newspapers universally condemned the violence in Mumbai, and urged Pakistan and India to work together to combat terrorism.
"Although one can understand the anger and concern which is widely felt, one would still advise the exercise of constraint in this hour of crisis," Pakistan's influential English-language daily Dawn newspaper said.
"There is need for confidence-building between the two countries."
http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/world/11/28/08/pakistan-denies-mumbai-involvement-pledges-cooperation

Ashraf Qamar


Save Pakistan To Save Us All
29 Nov 2008, 0034 hrs IST, Gautam Adhikar
 The ferocious cruelty and unprecedented nature of the terror strikes in Mumbai may have left many in the world gasping at the daring and
meticulous planning of the operation. There's also some mud on India's face as a result. But this is an excellent opportunity for New Delhi to try bold thinking and some sorely necessary plain speaking.
To start with, call a spade what it is. It's Pakistan. Much of global terrorism today, not just what hits India, emanates or is planned from Pakistan. Just take a few instances that are obvious to all in the know but the world's eyes seemed, till recently, reluctant to see.
Look at how Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, who masterminded the 9/11 operation of 2001, was captured in Pakistan; notice how Osama bin Laden and Ayman al Zawahiri are hiding and leading al-Qaeda from Pakistan, or the Pakistan-Afghan non-existent border, for years; count the jihadi terrorist groups that work from inside Pakistan who seem to enjoy considerable flexibility of movement within that country despite promises of crackdowns made periodically by the Pakistani security forces. And that's not all.
Recall that the US confronted Islamabad, to apparently little avail, with evidence of the involvement of Pakistan-inspired elements in the July bombing of the Indian embassy in Kabul; wonder how the world's premier nuclear smuggler and rogue proliferator, A Q Khan, can lead a low-profile, yet comfortable and virtually unexamined life in Pakistan while being under so-called house arrest, with no one from the rest of the world allowed to go near him; and, to gently remind everyone of India's concerns, Dawood Ibrahim a terrorist by any official standard continues to be sheltered by Pakistani security forces.
No, Pakistan's people are not the problem. To the contrary, it is the people and their future in other words, the viability of Pakistan's state and economy that the world must get together to stabilise and help prosper. There's no time to lose.
The world doesn't have to believe New Delhi, which has been warning about the threat of an unhinged Pakistan for years. Everyone in the know of things now sees the threat clearly; the point is to undertake a global approach to tackle the problem head-on.
Stabilising Pakistan which means genuinely democratising its polity and helping its economy grow back to a sustainable level of prosperity in the medium term will help ensure a viable future for the nation and its people, thereby beating the menace of Islamist extremism that provides ideological energy for jihadi terror. An unstable and economically desperate Pakistan, on the other hand, will continue to promote terrorism under the guidance of the ISI, which helps a corrupt military establishment keep its stranglehold on power by citing external threats and warning of chaos as the alternative to their remaining in effective charge despite the recent transition to civilian rule.
The world must call the Pakistani military's bluff and quickly. But the answer can't be a military one, except in the very limited sense by which sporadic raids are carried out by outside forces and unmanned aircraft or missiles into the badlands on Pakistan's border with Afghanistan, where the Taliban and al-Qaeda leadership run free. US president-elect Barack Obama perhaps sees the problem of Pakistan in stark outline, more so than the Bush administration for most of its tenure had cared to see. But increasing allied troop levels in Afghanistan alone won't be able to deal with the crux of the problem.
The crux of Pakistan's problem lies within that country, specifically in the country's military establishment. Remember it ain't Iraq, which itself is still not amenable to a military solution after five years of fierce armed intervention. This is a larger country, with a complicated terrain, and it genuinely has weapons of mass destruction which its armed forces would cleverly threaten to use if push ever came to real shove.
No, the answer might lie in a concerted global effort, at ensuring, first, the sustainability of Pakistan's democratic experiment. And, second, in pouring in as much assistance as required, under strict supervision of not just the IMF but perhaps a specially designed international political-economic authority that would oversee the country's direly needed transition from military domination to democratic viability.
In short, the world, under the newly assertive leadership of an Obama-led United States, must devise a Marshall Plan for Pakistan. Such an effort will require the support of not only the traditional G-7 powers; it must have the cooperation of India and, most importantly, China, which is Pakistan's all-weather friend.
If China, and to a large extent Saudi Arabia, can be persuaded to weigh in with their considerable influence financial as well as strategic over Islamabad, implementing a global plan to pull Pakistan out of chaos might actually succeed. And India should quietly help such a plan from the sidelines as a close ally, as it has become today, of the US.
If, however, China and Saudi Arabia choose to continue to offer their shoulders for Islamabad's military establishment to lean on in order to extract sustenance financial and strategic indefinitely, there won't be any hope of devising a global rescue plan for Pakistan. In which case, we might as well give up any serious hope of fighting terror. The export of the Pakistani-Afghan mayhem to the rest of the world will continue merrily.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Editorial/COMMENT_Save_Pakistan_To_Save_All/articleshow/3770216.cms

Ashraf Qamar


Pakistan to cooperate to nab terrorists behind Mumbai attack
Thu, Nov 27, 200
NEW DELHI: Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi said on Thursday that Pakistan would fully cooperate with India in its efforts to nab those behind the terrorist attacks in Mumbai, The Foreign Minister said terrorism is a menace threatening humanity, and stressed the need for joining hands in fighting this scourge. The Foreign Minister also expressed deep condolences with the bereaved families.
While India’s senior politician and Opposition leader L.K. Advani said on Thursday that various terrorist’s networks operating in the country wanted to destabilize India. Meanwhile, Indian journalist Kuldip Nayar said Indian security agencies had no clue about this attack and it was difficult to tell who was actually behind this act of terrorism.
Talking to media, senior journalist Nayar said that it was hard to identify the attackers, but added that they were holing some Israeli hostages. Nayyar quoted security agencies as saying that they had not received any report regarding this attack.-SANA
http://www.pak-times.com/2008/11/27/pakistan-to-cooperate-to-nab-terrorists-behind-mumbai-attack/

 

Adeeb neyazi


Baffling terrorism in Mumbai

OVER 100 people lost their lives and about 900 others received injuries in terrorist attacks in the Indian commercial city of Mumbai late Wednesday night. Dozens of terrorists hit sixteen places and two five stars hotels sending shock waves across the city leading to imposition of curfew.
Bomb blasts and suicide attacks have become a painful reality these days but the Mumbai mayhem has new and dangagencies erous dimensions. These were daredevil attacks not by one or two terrorists but dozens of individuals who did not plant bombs but hurled grenades and fired indiscriminately on people in different areas and locations of the city. The attackers, who later claimed to be members of an organization called Deccan Mujahideen, also took several people hostage including foreigners and made demands like liberation of Hyderabad, withdrawal of forces from Kashmir and severing of military ties with Israel. The security have claimed arrest of seven terrorists and investigations would hopefully lead to fuller details of who was behind the large-scale and planned killings. Mumbai attacks have made one thing absolutely clear that the menace of terrorism was a global phenomenon and not just confined to Pakistan or Afghanistan. Pakistan itself is the worst victim of the terrorism and its political leadership, army, law enforcing agencies, government officials and people at large have rendered great sacrifices in this unconventional war. It is, however, unfortunate that some forces always try to link terrorism with Pakistan and after every such incident India raised pointing fingers at Islamabad. This is despite the fact that domestic terrorism in India has gained roots over the years due to various reasons and as proved in Samjota Express bombing even serving Indian army officers are involved in acts of terrorism. It is because of this that Pakistan has been urging India for intelligence sharing but regrettably Indians have so far not bothered even to share their own findings into Samjota Express tragedy in which majority of victims were Pakistani nationals. We are confident that the problem can be contained through better cooperation and by taking steps aimed at addressing the root causes of terrorism.
http://pakobserver.net/200811/28/Editorial01.asp

Mubashir

Can Pakistan be trusted to fight Jehadism? A resounding YES. Why? because Pakistan is it's biggest victim. Is it an easy task? No! Even the US with all it's resources has not been able to fight it to the finish.

Casting aspirations on Pakistan is not the way to go. Let us not fall into the trap that these animal terrorists laid and start bickering between ourselves. Otherwise, they win, we lose.

Mubashir

Sanaullah
The Mumbai attacks: Unjustified terrorism
At the end of a year in which the global village is already suffering from the global economic crisis, the savage terror attacks that took place in Mumbai make our spirits even darker. These attacks recall the horror of 9/11 in that indiscriminate attacks were carried out against innocent civilians, focusing on symbolic hotels in the heart of the Indian economy.
It still has not been determined precisely who committed these attacks, which left over 450 people dead or injured, and why. The possibility of a connection with Al Qaeda has been raised, in that foreigners were regarded as targets, though slightly more persuasive claims have placed the attacks as the acts of a spontaneously formed organization harboring discontent with inequality within India. But whoever they are, and whatever cause or pretext they may present, there is no way to justify acts of indiscriminate slaughter against innocent people. It is for this reason that international society has unanimously denounced these attacks.
But history testifies that terrorism cannot be ended merely by denouncement of it or hard-line responses like the so-called “war on terror.” This is because matters such as domestic and international injustice and socioeconomic, religious and racial discrimination breed terrorism based in extremism and hatred. The Mumbai attacks are no exception. A clear-cut example of this is the statement by one terrorist, who said that the attacks were revenge for the execution of Muslims and shouted, “We love this land as our home country too, but where were you when our mothers and sisters were killed?”
After the fall of the Mughal Empire in the 19th century, Muslims were subjected to discrimination in India based on the divisive policy of Great Britain, India’s colonial ruler, and the situation now is no different. A study by the Indian government showed that Muslims, who make up 13.4 percent of India's total population of 1.1 billion, are poorer and less educated than Hindus and have shorter average life spans. Muslim wrath was also provoked by the Indian government's refusal to acknowledge the self-determination rights of Kashmir, recognized in a 1948 UN resolution. Without a solution to this problem, a solution to terror at its roots becomes inevitably difficult.
Another worrisome point with regard to these attacks is the possibility that the issue might escalate into a conflict between India and Pakistan. The two nations have already been involved in an argument over where responsibility lies. But a confrontation between the two nations is not at all welcome, in that there are great concerns that it might harm stability in already unstable Southeast Asia and rock international society. It is for this reason that the United States and the rest of international society must encourage a rational response from the two nations.
Please direct questions or comments to [englishhani@hani.co.kr]
http://english.hani.co.kr/arti/english_edition/e_editorial/324741.html
Sanaullah

Editorial: Attacks open new chapter in terrorism
Nov 29, 2008
The most alarming aspect of this week's horrific assault on Mumbai was the scale of the terrorists' ambition. The military-style attack was not only well planned and well orchestrated but, unusually, embraced an array of targets.
Residents of India's financial capital bore the brunt of onslaughts at the main railway station, the airport, a cinema and the city's southern police headquarters.
But, for the first time in India, Americans and Britons were specifically targeted as hostages were sought in attacks on two luxury hotels and a cafe frequented by tourists.
On the one hand, the breadth of the destruction obscured the terrorists' objectives. On the other, however, it confirmed that terrorism is as much, if not more, of a scourge as ever.
That harsh reality was emphasised by the method of attack. The Islamic militants, who are believed to have slipped ashore from boats, used automatic weapons and grenades, rather than the bombs employed in previous atrocities.
That meant the number of casualties did not approach the 190-plus Mumbai commuters who were killed when a series of seven blasts ripped through trains and stations in July 2006. But a death toll standing at more than 130 and the pictures of flames shooting from iconic landmarks spoke eloquently of the impact of this less sophisticated approach, and of a new tactical fluidity.
Analysts have their hands full attempting to identify the terrorists. A previously unknown group, the Deccan Mujahideen, has claimed responsibility, and there are suggestions the motive lies in contested claims to Kashmir or the treatment of India's 140-million Muslim minority.
The country's increasingly close ties with the United States are also a matter of contention. But the assault bore some of the hallmarks of an al Qaeda operation, notably simultaneous attacks and the targeting of Westerners and the hotels used by them. Significant al Qaeda leaders have been struck down by American drones, but if nothing else, the group clearly remains an inspiration for terrorist cells.
The degree of danger, and its global nature, had been re-emphasised even before the Mumbai carnage. The United States is on heightened alert as the inauguration of President-elect Barack Obama draws near.
Al Qaeda's number two, Ayman al-Zawahiri, has termed Mr Obama a "house Negro", and there is every incentive to undermine the new administration through an attack on the US. Further evidence of the threat was provided last month by the Australian
Security Intelligence Organisation, which, in its annual report, said Australia had only narrowly escaped terrorist attacks on its soil. The spy agency said that militant Islamic jihadists would remain its most potent enemy for the foreseeable future.
Terrorist organisations must, because of their inherent weakness, select soft targets. Australia and the US do not fit into that category. India, however, is more vulnerable than most.
It is open, particularly to intrusion from Pakistan, which remains a haven for terrorists. Densely populated and chaotic cities also provide a ready potential for surprise, as in the case of the Mumbai attack. Other Indian cities have also been assaulted in the past few months.
The world has reacted with anger to the horrors perpetrated in Mumbai. There was a similar reaction in September when a huge truck bomb devastated the heavily guarded Marriott Hotel in Islamabad, killing up to 60.
South Asia is bearing the brunt of terrorism at a time when Pakistan's relations with the US remain fraught. Repairing that relationship and restoring stability to the region through the elimination of extremism must be the top foreign-policy priority for the incoming American administration. The large-scale assault on Mumbai reinforced just how difficult that will be.
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10545614&ref=rss

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